Tensions Between the Us and the Soviet Union After Ww2

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Tensions between the US and the Soviet Union after World War II

The United States and the Soviet Union were never in a completely stable relationship. World War II had both nations working together, but partly only because Germany was a common enemy of them both. Roosevelt did not agree with communism, but would work alongside Stalin in order to stop a bigger issue, the Nazis. By helping each other out, they became part of the Big Three along with Britain. However, even working together wouldn’t resolve the differences between the two nations. Tensions and suspicions between the United States and the Soviet Union grew partly during WWII because of Soviet disregard to Allied goals, and dramatically increased in the post-war world when the spread of communism seemed to be threatening the free world that Franklin D Roosevelt had envisioned.

By invading the Soviet Union in 1941, Nazi Germany had broken the non-aggression pact the two nations had entered in 1939. Subsequently, the Soviet Union joined the Allies to defeat the Axis Powers. As the Soviets and Nazis were fighting on the eastern front, Stalin was feeling a lot of pressure. This was shown in the Tehran Conference in Iran when Stalin laid out his concerns that a western front against Germany to relieve pressure in the east was not opened yet. Churchill and Roosevelt agreed that they would open one within 6 months, but Stalin is already questioning their motives in the war. It wasn’t until D-Day in 1944 when western allies invaded Normandy that this was achieved. As the Allied forces advanced toward victory, the Big Three met at Yalta to discuss postwar issues. The fates of the nations of central and eastern Europe divided the three leaders. Stalin insisted the creation of pro-Soviet governments in central and eastern Europe while Roosevelt pressed for self determination and democratic elections in Poland and neighboring countries. Roosevelt agreed to accept a pledge from Stalin for future...
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