Tennis and Badminton Study Guide

Topics: Tennis, Tennis shots, Badminton Pages: 5 (1460 words) Published: August 3, 2013
Badminton Study Guide
History
Badminton evolved from a similar game called battledore played in fifth-century B.C. China. During the th 17 century, the game was played in India and there it was known as Poona. British army officers brought the game back to England around 1873. There the Duke of Beaufort became interested in the game and since it was played regularly at his country estate, Badminton, this name became associated with the game. The first U.S. badminton club opened in New York in 1978. In 1992, the game of badminton became a medal sport in the Summer Olympic Games. Badminton may be leisurely played indoors or outdoors as a recreational sport, or it may be a challenging and exciting competitive sport for the skilled participant.

Nature and Purpose of the game
Badminton is a racket game played by two (singles) or four (doubles) players on a rectangular court. The object is to serve the shuttle strategically and thereafter direct it with speed or accuracy to an unprotected point on the opponent’s court so that the opponent is unable to return the shuttle across the net or into the proper boundaries of the court area. Likewise, the opponent attempts to prevent the shuttle from falling to the court on his side of the net and to return it to an unprotected spot in his opponent’s court.

Equipment
Court Size: 20 feet wide by 44 feet long for doubles, 17 feet wide by 44 feet long for singles. Service court being 6 ½ feet from net Net height: 5 feet high and 5 feet 1 inch at posts Shuttle: also known as shuttlecock, bird, or birdie. May have cork or rubber base with plastic, nylon, or real feathers Racket: the frame is of lightweight material such as aluminum or wood, and strings are flat and crossed in a pattern.

44’

20’

2’6”

12’9”

6’5”

Badminton Playing Techniques
The basic difference between the strokes in badminton and those in tennis is that badminton requires greater wrist action. Here are just a few key points to remember: May use forehand or backhand grip Hold racket in the fingers rather than in the palm of the hand Grip should be firm, but not tight Wrist should be flexible After making a shot, return to “home” position (center of court)

2008 Badminton Study Guide

Be in ready position with weight evenly distributed on balls of feet, knees flexed Serve must be made with racket head below waist level when contacting bird o Long, high: snap wrist upon contact and whip the arm forward o Short, low: shuttle is struck softly and with “touch” o May serve underhand or backhand

Terminology
Side out – loss of service Fault – a violation of the rules Birdie – shuttlecock Let – serve hitting the top of the net and landing in the proper court, a serve retake Match – winning 2 out of 3 games Rally – a sequence of one or more strokes starting with the service, until the shuttle ceases to be in play. In side – team serving Out side – the team receiving Odd and Even Courts – In singles: At the beginning of the game and when the score is even, the server serves from the right service court. When it is odd, the server serves from the left service court. If the server wins a rally, the server scores a point and then serves again from alternate service court. If the receiver wins a rally, the receiver scores a point and becomes the new server. Game scoring – Played to 21. The side winning a rally adds a point to its score. At 20 all, the sides which gains a 2 point lead first, wins that game. At 29 all, the side scoring the 30th point, wins the game. The side winning a game serves first in the next game.

Types of Strokes
Clears – stroke where the birdie is hit overhead or underhand and travels in a high arc falling deep in the opponent’s court Smash – overhead smash shot is when the birdie is hit forcefully down into the opponent’s court and a full arm follow through is used. A smash is used when an opponent is positioned near the net Drop Shot – overhead shot that causes the birdie to...
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