Temporary Market in Hanoi

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Table of Contents

I- Introduction
1. Background
1.1 Definition of Hanoi’s temporary food markets and their overall importance in Hanoinians’ life, Page 4 1.2 Explanations for the need of dissolving temporary food markets in Hanoi, Page 5 1.3 The policies of temporary food market’s dissolution (TMD) and their effects, Page 9

2. Purpose and Research Question, Page 10
3. Research method, Page 10
II- Findings
1. Demand for shopping in temporary food markets of Hanoinians, Page 11 1.1 Income, Page 12
1.2 Habits, Page 12
1.3 Lifestyle, Page 13
1.4 Convenience from temporary markets, Page 13
2. The local Government’s implement and supporting policies
2.1 Obstacles in acquiring other marketplaces, Page 14
2.2 Obstacles in assisting new jobs for sellers, Page 15
2.3 Obstacles in municipal executive department, Page 15
3. Sellers in temporary markets and their attitudes to the policies.
3.1 Portrait of the sellers in temporary markets, Page 16
3.2 The sellers’ attitudes and reactions to the Government’s polices of TMD, Page 17 4. Alternatives for temporary markets
4.1 Permanent markets, Page 18
4.2 Convenience stores/ Food stores, Page 20
4.3 Supermarkets, Page 21

III. Conclusion, Page 24

IV. Appendix, Page 25

V. Bibliography, Page 27
1. Background
1.1 Definition of temporary food markets and the overall importance of them in Hanoinians’ life
No one knows when markets began to exist, yet it should be from a very long time, as people started to have demands for goods exchange. In some ancient pictures, we may realize that market, at the early age of the development, consisted of about 5-10 sellers, who put their products on the ground to sell. Along with the development of society, markets became larger with more sellers and more products. At that time, people started to classify markets for food, clothes or merchandise and assigned it to different areas.

In a food market, people sell all kinds of fresh food. At first, each seller[1] occupied their own places in the market. There was no management or security for them. Gradually, Government started to build walls or buildings to gather all the sellers, establish markets’ management, lease stalls and collect taxes. In developed countries, open-space food markets are almost replaced by supermarkets and convenience stores. However, in Vietnam, open-space food markets still play an important role in people’s life.

‘Market’ is a familiar term to all Vietnamese. In Hanoi, the 1000 year-old capital of Vietnam, there is a thick net of markets, as more and more people concentrate to live here. Especially, there are many big centre markets, which are in charge of trading goods for the whole Northern plain or the whole Vietnam. In general, yet, there are two kinds of food markets in Hanoi, which are permanent food markets and temporary food markets. For short using, we will call them permanent markets and temporary markets through out the text. Permanent markets are legal markets, which have walls surrounded, might be semi-open spaced, and have been existed for dozens of years. In these markets, there are always markets’ managers, who are in charge of managing the markets’ activities and control the quality standard of food in the markets. Meanwhile, temporary markets are illegal open spaced markets, built up freely by a group of people- mostly vendors- and exist for short time. These markets are established due to the demand for food shopping of people in a residential area, such as an industrial zone or a ward; hence, it may last for a few months (markets on pavements) to even more than 10 years (markets on small streets). No one is in charge of the food quality in here.

In Hanoi people’s life, ‘market’ is a familiar term. People in here don’t often distinguish the definition of...
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