Televisuality

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Televisuality

By | Feb. 2011
Page 1 of 2
Television shows constantly attempt to improve their techniques in order to bring a greater fidelity to real life. Televisuality and realism are emerging factors which coincide with the highly excessive stylistic emergence of television techniques that have changed the look of television. The use of mise-en-scene, editing, and narrative structures attempt to contribute to a sense of realism and authenticity while establishing the fundamental nature of television as a form of communication.

Televisuality and realism complement the recent development of television as an economically important and revenue generating cornerstone of consumer culture (Allen and Hill 295). Television has a huge cultural importance through its technology and style while being a means of social representation. Televisuality, a recent development, puts an emphasis on televisual style such as mise-en-scene, editing, and narrative structures (Caldwell 45). Mise-en-scene is an expression used to describe the design aspects of television production through visually artful techniques, storyboarding, cinematography, stage design, and in poetically artful ways through direction (Allen and Hill 298). Within television, mise-en-scene refers to everything that appears before the camera and its arrangement and composition of sets, props, actors, costumes, and lighting. Editing involves the selection and combining of shots into sequences, and ultimately creating a finished product. This is often referred to as the “invisible art” because when it is well practiced, the viewer can become so engaged that he or she is not even aware of the editor’s work (Allen and Hill 296). Narrative structure underlies the order and manner in which a narrative is presented to a viewer. Consequently, realism is intended to be invisible and natural implying the concept that film-making and television reproduce a realistic situation while bringing a greater fidelity to real-life. There are countless...