Television Violence and Aggressive Behavior

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Running Head: TELEVISION VIOLENCE CAUSES AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN

TELEVISION VIOLENCE CAUSES AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN
Research Paper
Paul Laporte (W0227581)
Developmental Psychology I

GDEV 1020

Instructor Constance Huyer

December 16, 2011

Table of Contents

Introduction………………………………………………………………………....Page 3 Literature Review…………………………………………………………………...Page 3 Discussion………………………………………………………………………..….Page 3 Cognitive Behavior Results....................................................................................Page 4 Commercial Violence………………………………………………………….....Page 5 Concerns………………………………………………………………………….Page 6 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………...Page 7 References…………………………………………………………………………...Page 9

Introduction
The purpose of this research paper is to discuss television violence and if it causes aggressive behavior in children. I believe unmonitored television viewing and aggressive violence has an impact directly and indirectly on children. There are also two sides to the effects it can produce. A literature review was conducted using Nova Net with background information obtained from articles, journals, and our textbook. Literature Review

Oldenburg’s (1992) Washington Post reported evidence from more than 3,000 research studies over two decades indicated a link to violence portrayed on television influenced attitudes and behavior of children. “According to an American Psychological Association task force report on television and American society, by the time the average child leaves elementary school, he or she will have witnessed at least 8,000 murders and more than 100,000 other assorted acts of violence on television” (Huston, et al., 1992). Huesmann (1986) proposed that there is a sensitive period between ages 8 and 12 during which children are particularly susceptible to the influence of television violence. Most Canadian children average more than six hours daily in front of a screen (Active Healthy Kids Canada, 2010) with only 10% of Canadian children meeting the recommended guideline of only two hours or less of screen time per day. Discussion

Cognitive Behavior Results
Characteristics of Viewers
Based on a critical literature review (Clapp, 1988) (Frazier, Bates, Dodge, & Petit, 1998) (Singer & Singer, 1986) (Huesmann, 1986) (Huesmann, Lagerspetz, & Eron, 1984) (Comstock and Paik, 1987, 1991) (Crump, C.A., September 1995) the following characteristics of viewers have been shown to affect the influence of television violence on behavior: • Age – Children as young as three years old have shown a relationship between aggression and television violence. However, children in middle childhood have a much more consistent and substantial relationship at earlier ages. The amount of violence watched in middle childhood is related to aggression in early adulthood. A longitudal study showed violence on television watched in early adulthood had no relationship with future ages. • Amount of television watched – Frenetic and hectic programming creating a high level of arousal in children can stimulate aggressive behavior, even though it is not the violence on television but the total amount being viewed. As a result of repeated exposure to media violence, people may perceive violence as an effective means of solving personal or social problems, and accept violence as a way of life. • Identification with television personalities – It shows if children can identify with a character on television then that violent behavior will be modeled. Television violence-induced aggression tends to be directed most strongly against those persons associated in the viewer’s mind with the victim of the observed violence. • Belief that television violence is realistic – That children may not always be able to separate the violence happening on television is not realistic. • Intellectual achievement – Children of lower intellectual...
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