Teeth Size of Neanderthals

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  • Topic: Neanderthal, Human, Teeth
  • Pages : 3 (1178 words )
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  • Published : April 23, 2013
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The Teeth size of Neanderthals has given Anthropologists and scientists a plethora of information to what types of foods they ate in the past. Scientists have studied Neanderthals teeth and the dental plaque to discover their past food tastes. It has been shown that food had gotten stuck on the teeth of these cavemen, allowing the types of food they ate to be researched and studied. Neanderthals show knowledge and capabilities that have never been thought, and may be smarter than given credit. Scientists predicted what Neanderthals once ate is by the types of animal remains found near and around the places they once inhabited, and by the isotopes found in their teeth. By knowing what types of animals lived around the area of the Neanderthals, we can only assume that they hunted and ate them. The Carbon isotopes found in the Neanderthal teeth was the main evidence of an intricate diet. The Microfossils of plants were found in the plaque of their teeth from many years ago. When dental plaque forms it becomes isolated, and the plant remains are leftover. This shows that we are able to benefit from bad dental care and the poor hygiene of the Neanderthals. Studies of the showed the Neanderthals had a very diverse diet. The study allowed the people of today to see that these people of the past enjoyed sweet treats like nuts, cereals, and legumes. Studies show the cavemen may have eaten water lilies, which were not polluted during this time. Evidence led us to believe that the Neanderthals were capable of harvesting food. Pollen was found close to these sites also gave more reason to believe that their diets were not strictly meat; the pollen proves the Neanderthals ate some type of plants (Viegas 2010). It is has been shown that these people of the past lived over 200,000 years. It’s hard to believe that the Neanderthals were able to survive extreme climate changes, especially such harsh freezing climate. (Goudarzi 2008) As modern humans, we have assumed that the...
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