Teens and Crimes

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 572
  • Published : May 7, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
09 December 2011

Should teenagers’ accused of violent crimes be tried and sentenced as adults?
There are many teenagers who do violent crimes, but to many people it’s different on how they should be punished. Most people who I spoke to said it all depends upon the crime and then there are some people who think the teenagers’ accused of the violent crime should be sentenced as adults, because they chose to act like adults. While it is wrong to commit a violent crime for a young teenager, I believe that they should not be sentenced as adults, because they have not yet developed full cognitive ability, should have the opportunity to counseling, and they should have a chance at life for a new beginning.

There are many convicted teens that have not yet developed the full cognitive ability, which allows them to see what is right and what is wrong. For example, in the article “Kids are kids-until they commit crimes”, Marjie Lundstrom tells us a story of Lionel Tate who was 12, now 14, when he savagely beat to death a 6-year-old girl, because he was supposedly imitating his World Wrestling Federation heroes when he pummeled his playmate, less than third his size. In this case Lionel was just having fun and didn’t know any better that he shouldn’t have been preforming the stunts on the girl. He did not mean to hurt the girl, it just happened on accident. (11) I believe that in such cases like this, a teenager should not be sentenced as an adult, but should have the privilege to counseling while still having a chance at life where he can grow up learning the right from wrong. “Hey they’re only kids.” (4)

Many teenagers might just need the counseling, so that way they know what is right and what is wrong. Counseling can really help a teenager out, especially at that age. In the article “Startling Finds on Teenage Brains”, Paul Thompson, a professor of neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Medicine, explains that there is a massive loss...
tracking img