Teenage Delinquency

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The recent fatal incident at an international residential school where two eight grade students shot one of their classmates made headlines as the first of its kind in India recently. It is also reported that the whole act was meticulously planned and the killers had no remorse at the killing and mentioned very casually that ''they have killed him''! The parents were also blamed for making the 'gun' available to them easily. The incidence of teenage aggression made a huge impact on the basis of use of a gun for the first time in India. However, such incidents are reported so much more frequently in the west. After this particular incident we saw many incident occurring like this in India . It is also true that many much incidents could be happening frequently but there are hardly any figures or references in India to show the mental, emotional and behavioral problems being faced by the kids today.

When adolescents start engaging in criminal activities, it is cause for concern. Delinquency means antisocial or violent behavior in young people, often involving criminal acts. Delinquent behavior is actually a legal term referring to acts committed by children or adolescents which are in violation of law. This legal definition is so broad however, that if we used it, most teenagers would be described as delinquent at one time or another, even if it was for breaking a municipal curfew or consuming a small amount of alcohol. So, to communicate more meaningfully, the mental health community has developed a psychiatric diagnosis called Conduct Disorder (CD) Conduct Disorder applies to individuals—typically adolescents— who consistently act in ways that violate the rights of others' or society's rules. This includes physical aggression and intimidation, destruction of property, deceitfulness, forced sexual activity, theft, truancy, and running away from home. To qualify for a diagnosis of Conduct Disorder, teenagers...
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