Teenage Contraception

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Teenage Contraception

In the United States, one out of three teenage girls will become pregnant at least once (“Teen Pregnancy”). Is this because teenagers nowadays are more irresponsible? Is it because they are not being taught the dangers of sex? This decade is vastly different from previous ones, and teenagers are given more freedoms. Sometimes, they may take their freedoms too far and get caught in situations young people shouldn’t be in. Some schools do have sex education classes and the students are taught how to prevent the consequences of the activity. The key question at hand is, are the students given the proper equipment to prevent pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases? Teenagers should be allowed access to birth control and other methods of protecting themselves from other sexual risks.

The legal age for consent to have sex is 16 years old in most states, but this does not stop teenagers who have not reached their 16th birthday from participating in sexual activities. A study reported that one out of four children between the ages of 11 and 16 said they had already had sex (Bartosik). There is not much we can do to change the fact that teens have sex, although parents can change their child’s chances on becoming one of these statistics. Through providing children under the age of 16 forms of birth control, parents can help prevent teenage pregnancy and reduce risks of them contracting sexually transmitted diseases.

Denying contraception is not going to prevent teenagers from sexual exploration. In fact, 13% of girls will have sex before the age of 16, and 15% of boys ("Facts on American Teens' Sexual and Reproductive Health”). Young people will still continue to have sex regardless of whether they are given preventative methods or not. Teenagers are curious and will sneak to do things not approved by their parents; you cannot stop them from having sexual intercourse. A child’s outlook on sex is not expected to abruptly change on the day...
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