Technology and Disability

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BOSTON: A team of top hackers working for Intel Corp's security division toil away in a West Coast garage searching for electronic bugs that could make automobiles vulnerable to lethal computer viruses. Intel's McAfee unit, which is best known for software that fights PC viruses, is one of a handful of firms that are looking to protect the dozens of tiny computers and electronic communications systems that are built into every modern car. It's scary business. Security experts say that automakers have so far failed to adequately protect these systems, leaving them vulnerable to hacks by attackers looking to steal cars, eavesdrop on conversations, or even harm passengers by causing vehicles to crash. “You can definitely kill people,” said John Bumgarner, chief technology officer of the U.S. Cyber Consequences Unit, a non-profit organization that helps companies analyze the potential for targeted computer attacks on their networks and products. To date there have been no reports of violent attacks on automobiles using a computer virus, according to SAE International, an association of more than 128,000 technical professionals working in the aerospace and the auto industries. Yet, Ford spokesman Alan Hall said his company had tasked its security engineers with making its Sync invehicle communications and entertainment system as resistant as possible to attack. “Ford is taking the threat very seriously and investing in security solutions that are built into the product from the outset,” he said. And a group of U.S. computer scientists shook the industry in 2010 with a landmark study that showed viruses could damage cars when they were moving at high speeds. Their tests were done at a decommissioned airport. SAE International charged a committee of more than 40 industry experts with advising manufacturers on preventing, detecting and mitigating cyber attacks. “Any cyber security breach carries certain risk,” said Jack Pokrzywa, SAE's manager of ground vehicle standards. “SAE Vehicle Electrical System Security Committee is

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Adapting to US culture tough for refugees
Washington: Many refugees to the U.S., who travel thousands of miles to a safe harbour, find that adjusting to linguistic and cultural differences is equally difficult than other immigrants, a new research carried out by two University of Dayton sociologists has revealed. “In one or two weeks, some refugees find themselves going from a place like a Burundian refugee camp to a Midwestern city like Dayton,” sociology professor Theo Majka said. “The journey from a rural environment in a developing country to a post-modern urban world causes all sorts of crises,” Majka added. Theo Majka, with co-author, fellow sociology professor and spouse Linda Majka, researched the experiences of refugees from six ethnic or cultural groups who have resettled in Dayton over the past 20 years. “In the new study, we wanted to see how the experiences of refugees differed from those of people who came here by choice,” Linda Majka said, adding: “We weren't sure what we would find.” They found that while both groups face many similar challenges, refugees, who often come directly to the U.S. from traumatic environments with vast cultural differences, experience significant mental health issues and need more education about Western cultural norms and expectations. “We found that this is a

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working hard to develop specifications which will reduce that risk in the vehicle area.” The group of U.S. computer scientists from California and Washington state issued a second report last year that identified ways in which computer worms and Trojans could be delivered to automobiles -- via onboard diagnostics systems, wireless connections and even tainted CDs played on radios systems. They did not say which company manufactured the cars...
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