Teamwork

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Successful Strategies for Teams
Team Member Handbook
by Frances A. Kennedy, Ph.D. Associate Professor, School of Accountancy and Legal Studies with Linda B. Nilson, Ph.D. Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation

Becoming skilled at doing more with others may be the single most important thing you can do to increase your value―regardless of your level of authority. Useem, Fortune 2006

                                                  Published by the Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation   Clemson University     © Frances A. Kennedy, 2008    

Teaming Handbook

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Table of Contents

PART 1: Introduction....................................................................... 4 Why Should I Learn to Team? PART 2: Teaming Basics.............................................................. 10 Stages of Development Team Players Teamwork Mental Models Teamwork Skills PART 3: Organizational Tools ...................................................... 36 PART 4: Problem-Solving Framework .......................................... 53 PART 5: Analysis Tools ................................................................ 58 PART 6: When Something Goes Wrong ...................................... 78 PART 7: References ..................................................................... 88

Whenever you see this box, you can find a template to help you with the tool! Download this Excel template at: www.clemson.edu/OT EI/Resources

Teaming Handbook

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PART 1. INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this handbook is to equip you with tools that can help your team work productively and successfully. These techniques will help your team organize information, organize and run effective meetings, and generate useful member contributions.

Objectives for You
After you read and start using this handbook in your team work, you will be able to: Recognize different team player styles and what each contributes to the team. Organize a new team with clear ground rules, roles, and responsibilities. Organize and run effective team meetings that stay on track. Practice project and time planning. Follow the Seven Steps of Problem-Solving. Apply more qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques solving problems. Know when and how to use the appropriate organizational and analysis tools.

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WHY SHOULD I LEARN TO TEAM?
FACTS: 81% of Fortune 500 companies are building at least partially teambased organizations, and at least 77% use temporary project teams to perform core work. Lawler, Mohrman, & Benson, 2001. In 2006, Fortune Magazine devoted an entire issue to teams June 12, 2006.

It is clear from the media and research that a growing number of companies are organizing their work around teams.

But why? And what does it mean to me?
An increasing number of companies are using business teams to respond quickly to changing conditions in an environment of intense global competition and increasing complexity. Changing an organization to compete in a highly volatile business environment usually requires multiple and continuous innovations. Achieving flexibility and innovations requires reorganizing into your work units to improve information flow, optimize synergies, and streamline work.

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This is what traditional organizations have looked like –

and this is what they are becoming.

In the traditionally organized organization, Cole has defined work responsibilities and receives his work instructions from his supervisor. He performs his work duties individually for the most part, and he alone is accountable for his work performance. In the networked organization, Cole’s successful performance depends on his interactions with many of his coworkers. He is a member of a work team expected to achieve excellence by optimizing the value and use of all members’ diverse skills and experiences. Therefore, Cole is both...
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