Teaching Tolerance in Schools

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ENG/102
Vicki Lynn Samson
Immigration in the United States
By Mary Savinon

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“Immigration is the act of foreigners passing or coming into a country for the purpose of permanent residence. Immigration is made for many reasons, including economic, political, family re-unification, natural disaster, poverty or the wish to change one’s surroundings voluntarily”.
I will be writing with a double edge sword, meaning I will first describe and define by definition of Legal Residents in the United States. Then I will explain the flip side of what an illegal immigrant affords the United States. As defined by our American Tax Laws and court systems, legal residents are any and all persons who apply and are granted status and admitted as refugees or admitted as non-immigrants for a United States temporary stay and are not required to leave by January 1, 2012. Under this status of legal residents the American Law and Court systems are extremely flexible; legal residents will also have the classification of students and temporary workers. Many of the legal residents, who have established a green card status is considered a lawful permanent residence in the United States, are able to buy homes, pay taxes, and attend public schools such as Universities and Colleges. Many American citizens don’t realize that a green card holder has the right and ability to join certain branches of the Armed Forces and apply to become a U.S. citizen providing they meet certain eligibility requirements.

The number of immigrants in 2006, totaled 37.5 million. Security got tougher after 9/11; nearly 8 million immigrants came to the United States between 2000 to 2005. That was more Page 3

Than in any other five year period in the nation’s history. The number of Immigrants in 2006 to be granted legal residence was 1.27 million. Because of family reunification 66 percent of foreign nationals became legal permanent residents in the United States in 2009. More immigrants have found a home in the United States than another nation since World War II. The analyst Kusum Mundra suggested in his econometrics report in 2010 was immigration positively affected bilateral trade when the U.S. had a networked community of immigrants. The United States has often been referred to as a “melting pot” (derived from Carl N. Degler, a historian, author). Meaning the United States has a rich tradition of immigrants coming to the U.S. looking for something better and having their cultures melded and incorporated into the fabric of the country. Immigrants help transform American society and culture, demonstrating that diversity, as well as unity, is a source of national strength.

Most of the immigrants coming to the United States are seeking a better life for their families. They are usually good workers and make important contributions to the economy through their productive labor and purchasing power. Legal immigration helps to provide several economic benefits for the United States. Most of the essential service jobs are filled by immigrants. Normally these jobs would remain vacant by U.S. citizens. Most American business want and need immigrant workers to fill these vacant jobs, because they can get the work done while also saving money because they can pay the immigrants less then U.S. citizens. Additionally, 25 percent of patents filed listed an immigrant as an inventor or co-inventor. Findings like these suggest that immigration helps to keep the American economy innovative.

It has also been shown that immigrants in the United States pay more in taxes than they consume in social services. Page 4

Immigrants pay both federal and state taxes they never have the opportunity to reclaim this money if they do not become citizens. This reduces the tax burden on native-born American citizens.

The research conducted of unauthorized Immigrants that are living in the United States...
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