Teaching Case

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Case study
I. Executive Summary

The teaching hospital and the medical school had only one top official in common-the provost.

The unusual nature of the financial arrangements was a big problem. Patients paid for professional services, but the revenues went into department funds, which were controlled by the department chairs. The hospital, on the other hand, turned in all patient- revenue incomes to the state. The working conditions and compensation were much better in the medical school than those in the hospital. There was a serious lack of coordination in the integration of medical school faculty into hospital functions. Dr. Robert Uric, head of the renal unit was one exception. The hospital employees with whom he worked all liked him very much.

One of the reasons was he often shared his grant monies with the hospital employees in his unit whenever it was possible. Dr. Uric took the renal unit as his home and his favorite child financially and emotionally. The renal unit was a cheerful place under the leadership of Uric. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) supported Dr. Uric with several federal grants to do research on kidney transplantation. In the research Dr. Uric discovered a fluid that could keep the cut stem end from closing. According to the grant agreement, Uric reported his discovery to NIH. NIH officials did not want it. Uric sold the fluid to a big nursery-supply manufacturer; the firm named it Flower Life, and began mass-producing. NIH regretted and filed suit at a sudden, the story was widely spread across the nation on newspapers. The faculty concerned the story would make a bad influence on the reputation of the school, and Uric was moved to another new unit.The executive committee promoted Dr. George Conrad (the chief resident of renal medicine) to replace Uric’s position after the removal of Uric. Serious personnel problems arose in the dialysis unit not long after Conrad took the position. B y the end of the first month employees started to leave the renal unit; three months later ninety percent of the old employees were gone. Interns on rotation through renal medicine complained about Conrad attitude toward and treatment of them; the roster of residents applying to the service dropped dramatically. Astonished by the realization of how bad the situation had become, the dean and the executive committee had to place Uric back to be the head of the renal unit again.

• Major Problem

Competition between the Hospital and Medical School

• Summary of Recommended Plan of Action

The provost administration’s appropriate segregation of duties and responsibilities must be implemented as soon as possible through this the competition could be lessen if officers would be treated equally. Together with the collection and payment of funds for salaries, wages and benefits. Working condition must also be improve to encourage employees motivation and responsibility.

II. Statement of the Problem

• State the problem facing the manager/key person (Provost)

1. Unusual nature of financial arrangement

2. Inconsistencies between the operation of the hospital and those of medical school

3. Peculiar behavior of Head Renal Unit (Dr. Uric)

- transplantation

- disapproval made by NIH and university officials

- Dr. Uric in a covert position

4. Improper conveyance of position of Dr. Conrad

5. Lack of communication

6. Dr. Conrad’s disruption of routine

• Identify and link the symptoms and root causes of the problem

1.grant moneys ; because of the financial flexibility, working condition were also frequently better on the medical school side and medical school staff had money for more equipment, more travel and even more parties; salaries for physicians

2. faculty members of the school also operate hospital functions

3. unprofessional...
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