Tax and Money

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 61
  • Published : December 21, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Money - buying, selling and paying

Personal finance
Sometimes in a shop they ask you: 'How do you want to pay?' You can answer: 'Cash. / By cheque. / By credit card.' In a bank you usually have a current account, which is one where you pay in your salary and then withdraw money to pay your everyday bills. The bank sends you a regular banki statement telling you how much money has gone in and out of your account. You may also have a savings account where you deposit any extra money that you have and only take money out when you want to spend it on something special. If you spend more than you have in your account you can have an overdraft. The bank allows you to spend morel and charges you interest. If your account is overdrawn [you have taken more out of your account than you had in it] you are%in the red (as opposed to in the black or in credit). Sometimes the bank may lend you money - this is called a bank loan. If the bank [or building society] lends you money to buy a house, that money is called a mortgage /'mo:gid3/.

When you buy [or purchase more formally] something in a shop, you usually pay for it outright but sometimes you buy on credit. Sometimes you may be offered a discount or a reduction on something you buy. For example, you might get £10 off perhaps because youl are a student. You are often offered a discount if you buy in bulk.-It is not usual to haggl about prices in a British shop, as it is in, say, a Turkish market. If you want to return something which you have bought to a shop, you may be given a refund, i.e. your money] will be returned, provided you have a receipt. The money that you pay for services, e.g. to a school or a lawyer, is usually called a fee o fees; the money paid for a journey is a fare. If you buy something that you feel was very good value, it's a bargain. If you feel that it is definitely not worth what you paid for it, then you...
tracking img