Taste Threshold

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Science Independent Project

taste threshold Practical Report

hYphothesis
The lesser the concentration of the solution, the lighter its taste become. The result will be subjective. Aim
The aim is to determine an accurate common threshold of taste for sweetness, sourness and saltiness by determine what is the lowest concentration of a solution that still has perceptible taste for salt, sugar and vinegar. Risk Assessment

Risk| Mitigation|
1. Injury from broken glass cylinder.| Wear safety glove, handle cylinder carefully.| Water spills on the floor -> slippery floor.| Handle container carefully, wear safety footwear.|

EQuipment
* salt
* table sugar (sucrose)
* vinegar
* water ( distilled)
* spoon
* gram scale
* 100 mL graduated cylinder
* 10 mL graduated cylinder
* Ear buds
* cup
* paper towels
* notebook & pen

METHOD
- The solutions should be taste by more than 1 person for more accurate results. - Make a data table in your notebook like the one below.
Substances| 10%| 5%| 1% | 0.1%|
Table sugar (sucrose)| | | | |
Salt| | | | |
Vinegar| | | | |

1. Measure 720ml of distilled water and pour it into a cup. Add 80g of sugar. Stir until dissolved. This gives you a 10% (weight/weight) sucrose solution. Note any other observations that you make. 2. Rinse your mouth with water and wipe your tongue dry with a clean paper towel. 3. Dip a clean ear bud into the 10% sugar solution and taste it with the tip of your tongue. If you can taste the sweetness, put a “+” in your data table for 10% sucrose. Note any other observations that you make.

4. Now measure out 80 ml of the 10% sucrose solution and pour it into a clean paper cup. Add 720ml of distilled water and stir. (Use a clean stirrer, or else thoroughly rinse and dry the previous stirrer, so that you don't carry over concentrated solution into the dilute solution.) This will give you a 1%...
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