Tamilnadu Power Crisis Reason

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Abstract : In this paper, I have made an attempt to study the present power situation in Tamil Nadu, a state that has attracted plenty of FDI in power critical industries. Presently, the environment is conducive for big companies to invest in Tamil Nadu. However, there are many challenges to ensure that the requirements are met both for domestic and industrial application. The study examines the current scenario and provides detailed inputs on the various means for providing power.

Electric power –the power of the present of world:
The availability of quality and reliable power is critical for economic development of the State.Growth in power consumption is an indicator of industrial,agricultural and commercial growth of a State. Rapid and self sustaining growth of power sector and its financial viability is essential for its speedier and sustained socio-economic development of a state. Availability of sufficient power at reasonable rates will have multiplier effect on the economy of the state through increase in investments and improved productivity of agriculture, industry and commerce.

Intro of tamilnadu and its power management:
TamilNadu is the eleventh largest state in India with an area of 130,058 km2 [50,216 sq mi] and the seventh most populous state with a population of 66,396,000. It is the fourth largest contributor to India's GDP and the most urbanised state in India. The state has the highest number (10.56%) of business enterprises in India compared to its population share of about 6%. Tamil Nadu

lately emerged as the most literate state in India as announced by Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD). The
top 13 cities in Tamil Nadu are Chennai, Coimbatore, Madurai, Trichy, Salem, Erode, Tirunelveli, Tirupur, Vellore, Tuticorin, Thanjavur, Nagercoil and Dindigul. These cities are built-up with the presence of large and small industries that use electricity as a main source of energy for manufacturing their products the demand for power in these cities are growing.

With agriculture emerging as the largest consumer of power in the state, Tamil Nadu holds the distinction of being one of the first states to undertake massive rural electrification programme. Currently the Tamil Nadu Electricity Board (TNEB), a state sector enterprise, is the main energy provider and distributor.

The TNEB is a statutory body corporate constituted under the Electricity (Supply) Act, 1948 (Central Act 54 of 1948) and authorised to function as the State Transmission Utility and a Licensee by the notification issued by the Government of Tamil Nadu under clause (a) of Section 172 of the Electricity Act, 2003.

The Power Crisis in Tamil Nadu
The power crisis has come to stay in the state of Tamil Nadu. For many months now, power cuts for over six hours in the towns and villages of the state have been the norm. Chennai, which till recently was spared the rigours of power shedding has now been brought into the ambit. This poses a question on the state trying to attract more and more investment, giving assurances of uninterrupted power supply.

Load shedding-the strength of present TNEB
Load shedding which was originally meant for an hour or so, has now been extended to three hours in many suburbs of the city. While this has affected homes and commercial establishments, the industries in and around the city (High Tension power consumers) have been hit hard by strict regulations on hours of load shedding, with many units being forced to shut down operations for an entire day each week. Industry sources are also upset over the fact that while manufacturing units consume only 35% of the 9500 MW power consumption in Tamil Nadu, they are being forced to suffer load shedding far more than domestic consumers. Many units have begun operating shifts with the help of diesel generators, but this is proving to be an expensive solution which is...
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