Sylvia Plath Final

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Rebecca Wayne
Ms. Arnold
English 3°
May 1st, 2012
 
Sylvia Plath Research Paper
What made Sylvia Plath think it was okay to hurt her mother and kids by committing suicide? Her whole life was a struggle, with all depression she went through. Sylvia getting denied, being depressed, the death of her father, and her miscarriage had pushed her to do what she had done. Sylvia had a rough childhood without her father, who passed away when she was eight years old. When she was refused admission to the Harvard writing Seminar and then rejected from a summer writing course there, had pushed her even more into depression. Also, Sylvia’s husband had, had an affair; and she couldn’t take the depression it put her in anymore. She had many suicide attempts, attempting overdose on sleeping pills, and purposely getting into a car crash. Then she finally killed herself, by sealing off the kitchen doors, turning on the gas oven, and then sticking her head into it. Three poems by Sylvia Plath that best describes her depression and loss of family are: “Mirror”, “Daddy”, and “Whiteness I Remember.”             Sylvia Plath’s poem, “Daddy” shows how the death of her father was an important aspect of her depression and suicide. The poem discusses the death of her father, Otto, and what he can’t do anymore because of his death.  In 1940, when Sylvia was eight, her father, “Otto Plath died from complications of gangrene in his leg resulting from an untreated case of diabetes mellitus.” (Life and Death 1). When Plath was told of her father’s death, she proclaimed that she would never speak to God again. Though she didn’t know him that well, his death was a starting point of her depression. Later that year, she had written a poem which was printed in the children’s section of the Boston Herald. “It was a short poem, ‘about what I see and hear on hot summer nights,’ but it was her first publication, at the age of eight.” (Plath 1932- 63 1). The next year, after the United States'...
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