Swot Analysis of Indian Agriculture

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  • Topic: Agriculture, Irrigation, Food security
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  • Published : August 30, 2012
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SWOT Analysis of Indian Agriculture
Prof. DR. Sanjay B. Kadu,
Vidya Bharti Mahavidyalaya,
Camp, Amravati.
prof.dr.sanjay.b.kadu@gmail.com
mr.skadu@rediffmail.com
Mobile : 9420189295
____________________________________________________________________________________________ India is an agricultural country; one third population depends on agriculture sector directly or indirectly. Agriculture continues to be the mainstays of the Indian economy. Hence, adequate production and even distribution of food has lately become a high priority global concern. With the changing agricultural scenario and global competition, there is a need of exploiting the available resources at maximum level. In the view of changing agriculture scenario and global competition, we must be study of Indian Agriculture as per following- Weakness of Indian Agriculture

The development of new and improved varieties of plants and availability of such varieties to Indian farmers is of crucial importance for a sustained increase in agricultural productivity.
India’s recent growth has had a strong urban bias: while the services sector is booming, agricultural productivity has declined. This has adversely affected India’s poor, most of who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods.

The use of inputs such as fertilizers, other agrochemicals, improved seed varieties and irrigation appears to have had a limited impact on agricultural growth. Diffusion of fertilizer consumption in Indian agriculture has been quite widespread. The imbalances in the use of N, P and K have become highly conspicuous.

Agriculture contributes only 17.8% of India’s GDP. India occupies the top slot in dairy and fruits production while also occupying the first or second position in the world in several crops in terms of area and production. But their term of productivity of some crops is not only low but they also remained stagnant over the years. The position of India is miserable.

India is yet to take a firm ground primarily due to its unique pattern of land holdings, poor infrastructure, lack of farmers’ inclination to take risk, socio-economic and demographic conditions. Fragmented land holding in India is a measure challenge as the majority of the farmers in India are Small and Marginal farmers.

Financial institutions are not able to provide hassle free and timely delivery to farmers. 50% of farming community availing credit facilities from private money lenders on higher interest rate which results into rural indebtedness.

In the US subsidy to 900,000 farmers has increased by 700 times since 1996. From 1998 to 2000, the US provided an additional 26 billion dollars to its farmers. But in India, we are told that our 'aggregate measure of support' (AMS), a measure of subsidies that are provided to agriculture; is negative and we can still raise our subsidies to the farmers. But in reality, India is committed to doing away with agricultural subsidies under the 'structural adjustment programme' of the World Bank and the IMF. India provides only one billion dollar worth of indirect subsidies to its 560 million farmers.

The agricultural research and extension systems need to be strengthened to improve access to productivity enhancing technologies.

Inadequate Irrigation facility for agriculture sector.

Strength of Indian Agriculture :

World Bank assistance to enhance agricultural productivity:

The Government of India is placing a high priority on raising agricultural productivity to achieve agricultural growth and reduce rural poverty.

On July 24, 2006, the World Bank launched the US$200 million National Agricultural Innovation Project to increase agricultural productivity in the country by accelerating collaboration among public research organizations, farmers, the private sector and stakeholders in using agricultural innovations....
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