Swot Analysis and Established Companies

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WHAT IS A SWOT ANALYSIS AND WHY SHOULD YOU USE ONE?

Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat. A SWOT analysis guides you to identify the positives and negatives inside your organization (S-W) and outside of it, in the external environment (O-T). Developing a full awareness of your situation can help with both strategic planning and decision-making. The SWOT method (which is sometimes called TOWS) was originally developed for business and industry, but it is equally useful in the work of community health and development, education, and even personal growth. SWOT is not the only assessment technique you can use, but is one with a long track record of effectiveness.

WHEN DO YOU USE SWOT?
A SWOT analysis can offer helpful perspectives at any stage of an effort. You might use it to: * Explore possibilities for new efforts or solutions to problems. * Make decisions about the best path for your initiative. Identifying your opportunities for success in context of threats to success can clarify directions and choices. * Determine where change is possible. If you are at a juncture or turning point, an inventory of your strengths and weaknesses can reveal priorities as well as possibilities. * Adjust and refine plans mid-course. A new opportunity might open wider avenues, while a new threat could close a path that once existed. SWOT also offers a simple way of communicating about your initiative or program and an excellent way to organize information you've gathered from studies or surveys.

WHAT ARE THE ELEMENTS OF A SWOT ANALYSIS?
A SWOT analysis focuses on the four elements of the acronym, but the graphic format you use varies depending on the depth and complexity of your effort. Remember that the purpose of performing a SWOT is to reveal positive forces that work together and potential problems that need to be addressed or at least recognized. INTERNAL | EXTERNAL |

Strengths | Weaknesses | Opportunities | Threats |
 |  |  |  |

LISTING YOUR INTERNAL FACTORS: STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES.
Internal factors include your resources and experiences. General areas to consider are: * Human resources - staff, volunteers, board members, target population * Physical resources - your location, building, equipment (Does your building have a prime location? Does it need renovations?) * Financial - grants, funding agencies, other sources of income * Activities and processes - programs you run, systems you employ * Past experiences - building blocks for learning and success, your reputation in the community LISTING EXTERNAL FACTORS: OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS (O, T)

Cast a wide net for the external part of the assessment. No organization, group, program, or neighborhood is immune to outside events and forces. Consider your connectedness, for better and worse, as you compile this part of your SWOT list. Forces and facts that your group does not control include:

* Future trends - in your field (Is research finding new treatments?) or the culture (Do current movies highlight your cause?) * The economy - local, national, or international
* Funding sources - foundations, donors, legislatures
* Demographics - changes in the age, race, gender, culture of those you serve or in your area * The physical environment (Is your building in a growing part of town? Is the bus company cutting routes?) * Legislation (Do new federal requirements make your job harder or easier?) * Local, national or international events

PANADERÍA Y PASTELERÍA EL ROSARIO
A HISTORY OF UNIQUE FLAVOR ...

Talking about “Panadería El Rosario” is talking about the "Niña Blanquita" as is recognized by its customers, the woman whose drive and vision enabled it to this traditional bakery, made a preferential space in the table of thousands of Salvadoran families who have shared the quality and variety of its products for generations.

From a bakery’s family, "Niña Blanquita" learned in 1957 the...
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