Swot Analysis

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  • Topic: Sprint Nextel, WiMAX, Alltel
  • Pages : 10 (1895 words )
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  • Published : March 17, 2013
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Melinda Corathers

MBA600I

12/14/2012

SWOT Analysis

Table of Contents

Defining SWOT Analysis………………………………………………………………..p. 3

How to Use SWOT Analysis……………………………………………………………p.4

Example SWOT Analysis………………………………………………………………..p.7

Specific SWOT Analysis for Sprint Nextel Corporation……………………………....p.9

Key Points..……………………………………………………………………………….p.12

References………………………………………………………………………………..p.13

Defining SWOT Analysis

SWOT Analysis is a useful technique that a company can use to identify their strengths and weaknesses, and for identifying both the opportunities open to them and the threats that they face.

Used in a business context, a SWOT Analysis helps carve a sustainable niche in the company’s market. Used in a personal context, it helps a person develop their career in a way that takes best advantage of their talents, abilities and opportunities.

SWOT Analysis is particularly powerful, in that it can help a company uncover opportunities that they are well placed to exploit. And by understanding the weaknesses of the business, they can manage and eliminate threats that would otherwise catch you unawares.

More than this, by looking at themselves and their competitors using the SWOT framework, a company can start to craft a strategy that helps them distinguish themselves from their competitor, therefore, enabling them to successfully compete in their market.

(Hill, T. & R. Westbrook, 1997)

How to Use SWOT Analysis

SWOT Analysis was originated by Albert S Humphrey in the 1960s, and it is as useful now as it was back then. It can basically be used in one of two ways - as a simple icebreaker helping people get together to "kick off" strategy formulation, or in a more sophisticated way as a serious strategy tool. ("Albert Humphrey the "Father" of TAM". TAM UK.)

Strengths and weaknesses are often internal to an organization, while opportunities and threats generally relate to external factors. For this reason the SWOT Analysis is sometimes called Internal-External Analysis and the SWOT Matrix is sometimes called an IE Matrix.

To conduct a successful SWOT Analysis, a company should ask the following questions about the strengths of their company:

Strengths:

What advantages does your organization have?

What do you do better than anyone else?

What unique or lowest-cost resources can you draw upon that others can't?

What do people in your market see as your strengths?

What factors mean that you "get the sale"?

What is your organization's Unique Selling Proposition (USP)?

Strengths should be considered from both an internal perspective, and from the point of view of your customers and people in your market.

Also, if there is any difficulty identifying strengths, it can be beneficial to write down the company’s characteristics, which could end up being considered strengths.

Strengths should be looked at in relation to competitors. For example, if most competitors provide high quality products, then a high quality production process would not be considered a strength in your organization's market, rather it is a necessity. It is also important to question your weaknesses:

Weaknesses:

-What could you improve?

-What should you avoid?

-What are people in your market likely to see as weaknesses?

-What factors lose you sales?

This is considered on an internal and external basis: Do other people seem to perceive weaknesses that you don't see? Are your competitors doing any better than you?

It is best to be realistic in the present, and to face any unpleasant truths about the company as soon as possible. Finally, it is...
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