Sustainable Architecture

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Sustainable
 Architecture
 
 

The
 following
 paragraph
 is
 a
 discussion
 of
 sustainability
 as
 an
 architectural
 concept.
 The
 main
 issue
  is
 to
 illuminate
 the
 different
 aspects
 of
 sustainable
 architecture
 being
 more
 than
 just
 a
 calculation,
  and
 rather
 a
 tectonic
 solution
 with
 high
 architectural
 quality.
 This
 closely
 relates
 to
 context
 and
  human
 needs.
  In
 recent
 years,
 the
 attention
 given
 to
 sustainable
 and
 environmental
 design
 has
 only
 become
  more
 severe
 as
 a
 result
 of
 climate
 changes
 and
 rising
 energy
 prices.
 The
 entire
 change
 in
  architecture
 and
 design
 was
 initiated
 decades
 ago,
 fiercely
 debating
 the
 sustainability
 in
 building
  construction
 and
 city
 planning
 to
 the
 present
 day.
 Though
 instead
 of
 reaching
 a
 clear
 definition,
  the
 concept
 of
 sustainability
 has
 become
 mainstream
 and
 vague.
 
 
  In
 the
 genuine
 architectural
 practice,
 sustainability
 is
 the
 concept
 of
 saving
 resources
 in
 building
  developing
 and
 city
 planning,
 in
 terms
 of
 reducing
 the
 use
 of
 fossil
 fuels
 and
 other
 non-­‐renewable
  energy
 sources.
 Instead
 the
 site-­‐specific
 climate
 and
 topographic
 features
 are
 to
 benefit
 the
 built
  environment
 and
 architecture.
 (Pedersen
 2009)
 This
 is
 what
 is
 immediately
 and
 commonly
  associated
 with
 sustainable
 architecture.
 Introducing
 the
 term
 Sustainable
 Development,
 the
  Brundtland
 Commission’s
 Report
 of
 1987
 assumes
 the
 same
 point
 of
 view
 but
 takes
 the
  considerations
 of
 sustainability
 a
 step
 further
 by
 stating
 ”sustainable
 development
 is
  development
 that
 meets
 the
 needs
 of
 the
 present
 without
 compromising
 the
 ability
 of
 future
  generations
 to
 meet
 their
 own”.
 The
 report
 suggests
 a
 more
 general
 approach
 to
 the
 concept
 than
  merely
 environmental
 aspects,
 and
 thus
 imposes
 the
 economic
 and
 social
 aspects
 to
 meet
 the
  requirements
 of
 both
 present
 and
 future
 generations.
 
  The
 concept
 of
 architectural
 sustainability
 suggests
 a
 more
 holistic
 approach
 to
 what
 is
 genuine
  sustainable.
 Not
 only
 should
 the
 quantitative
 and
 physical
 requirements
 of
 i.e.
 daylight,
 fresh
 air,
  and
 indoor
 temperature
 be
 implemented;
 the
 qualitative
 and
 tectonic
 heritage
 of
 architecture
  should
 on
 equal
 terms
 be
 secured
 to
 make
 a
 durable
 solution.
 A
 solution
 that
 architecturally
  facilitates
 both
 experienced
 and
 technical
 aspects
 that
 are
 both
 considered
 human
 need.
 If
 not
  implementing
 the
 tectonic,
 what
 is
 the
 building
 if
 not
 just
 machine?
 
  The
 environmental
 aspect
 has
 the
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