Surgical Training in Simulation

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Surgical Training In Simulation

1.0 Abstract
This articles is about surgical training using simulation. Simulation is one of the most powerful analysis tools available to those responsible for the design and/or operation of complex processes or systems. It is heavily based upon computer science, mathematics, probability theory and statistics: yet the process of simulation modeling and experimentation remains very much an intuitive art. Simulation is a very general and somewhat ill-defined subject. For the purpose of this paper, we will define simulation as, “the process of designing a computerized model of a system (or process) and conducting experiments with this model for the purpose either of understanding the behavior of the system and/or of evaluating various strategies for the operation of the system.” This paper will highlights the usage of surgical in simulation training and its benefit to the medical training. This articles will focus on the surgical training that use simulation.

Keyword : Simulation, Surgical training.

2.0 Introduction
The term simulation is used in different ways by different people. As used here, simulation is defined as the process of creating a model (i.e., an abstract representation or facsimile) of an existing or proposed system (e.g., a project, a business, a mine, a watershed, a forest, the organs in your body) in order to identify and understand those factors which control the system and/or to predict (forecast) the future behavior of the system. Almost any system which can be quantitatively described using equations and/or rules can be simulated. Simulation is a powerful and important tool because it provides a way in which alternative designs, plans and/or policies can be evaluated without having to experiment on a real system, which may be prohibitively costly, time-consuming, or simply impractical to do. That is, it allows you to ask "What if?" questions about a system without having to experiment on the actual system itself (and hence incur the costs of field tests, prototypes, etc.). Computer simulation is the discipline of designing a model of an actual or theoretical physical system, executing the model on a digital computer, and analyzing the execution output. Simulation embodies the principle of ``learning by doing'' --- to learn about the system we must first build a model of some sort and then operate the model. The use of simulation is an activity that is as natural as a child who role plays. Children understand the world around them by simulating (with toys and figurines) most of their interactions with other people, animals and objects. As adults, we lose some of this childlike behavior but recapture it later on through computer simulation. To understand reality and all of its complexity, we must build artificial objects and dynamically act out roles with them. Computer simulation is the electronic equivalent of this type of role playing and it serves to drive synthetic environments and virtual worlds.

Simulation, according to Robert E. Shannon (1975), is “the process of designing a model of a real system and conducting experiments with this model for the purpose either of understanding the behavior of the system or of evaluating various strategies (within the limits imposed by a criterion or set of criteria) for the operation of the system. Simulation is one of the most powerful analysis tools available to those responsible for the design and/or operation of complex processes or systems. It is heavily based upon computer science, mathematics, probability theory and statistics: yet the process of simulation modeling and experimentation remains very much an intuitive art. Simulation is a very general and somewhat ill-defined subject. For the purpose of this paper, we will define simulation as, “the process of designing a computerized model of a system (or process) and conducting experiments with this model for the purpose either of understanding the behavior...
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