Sure Thing

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In David Ives’ short one-act comedy play Sure Thing he examines a number of variations in which a conversation between a man and woman could take place. The theme, setting, plot, and characters in this play are essential to the understanding and captivation of the audience. With every exchange of conversation there is the ability to regain a fresh start by getting a second chance to make a good impression. The main themes in Sure Thing are a fresh start and second chances as symbolized by the ringing of the bell. Other themes which are just as important are the emergence of romance, the possibilities of romance (and impossibilities), and the way language can be used to dance in and out of these possibilities. The ability to change a conversation from awkward to a “Sure Thing” with just a few words is something that everyone at some point would love to be able to do. During Bill and Betty’s encounter, a ring of a bell continues to disrupt their connection. Despite the ringing bell, or because of the ringing bell, the two characters are able to establish a connection. The fact that they are ultimately able to establish a connection suggests many things about relationships, such as that timing can play a major role in either beginning or not beginning a relationship. In this play, the bell when rung signifies that something wrong or inappropriate was said and then you have another chance to say the right thing. The setting of this play is simple, a coffee shop where the swift conversations begin with the two main and only characters Bill and Betty. From the beginning till the end of the play there are a series of pick-up lines, from a man to a woman sitting in a coffee shop reading. The setting is perfect for what Ives’ is trying to portray. Most people have had a conversation in a coffee shop with a stranger that they walk away from and wish they had said something different. I don’t know how many times I have walked away from a conversation wondering...
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