Supporting Good Practice in Managing Employment Relations

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Supporting Good Practice in Managing Employment Relations

Page 1 – Contents Page

Page 2 - Describe 4 factors, 2 internal and 2 external, which impact on the employment relationship

Types of Work Contract and employment status

Examples of legislation that impact on peoples working hours

Page 3 -Examples of legislation that impact on peoples working hours

Four ways in which the legal system supports working parents.

Page 4 - 2 reasons why it is important to treat employees fairly in relation to pay

Concepts of direct discrimination, indirect discrimination, Harassment and Victimization the equalities legislation that relates to each

Page 5 - Psychological Contract

Fair and unfair dismissal, an example of each and the impact on the organisation.

The importance of exit interviews for both the organisation and for employees.

Page 6 - Redundancy the keys stages and its effect on a organisation

Page 7- Redundancy the keys stages and its effect on a organisation

Page 8 - References

1. Describe 4 factors, 2 internal and 2 external, which impact on the employment relationship. There are many factors which have an impact on organisation and employee relationships. Key examples of both internal and external are given below. Internal

Organisation Culture –The culture can have a huge effect on the employment relationship. For example, if the company shows a willingness to allow flexible working hours, then it stands to reason that the employees will be more likely to accept any changes in the terms and conditions of their employment and also show a willingness to help the business succeed. Investment in employee’s training needs - Ongoing training within the organisation shows a commitment by the company to its employees and make employees feel valuable and an asset to the company. External

Legislation – The change in legislation on the retirement age will have an impact on the employment relationship. With employees having the rights to continue working until they choose to means that key skills and experience will stay with an organisation for longer and that can be a great positive. Economic Climate – If the economical climate is at a low people can feel insecure within their jobs or on the other hand companies may not have the finances to invest in their employees training needs.

2. Types of Work Contract and employment status
There are numerous types of contracts – a brief description of a few can be found below. Permanent Contract – This type of contract is for an employee who has been hired for a position without a pre determined time limit. Temporary – This type of contract is usually used when no end date is known and its termination is dependent on when on an event such as return from sick leave or maternity leave, or completion of a job. Fixed Term – This type of contract has a definite start and end date, terminates automatically when a particular task or specific event has been completed It is important for both the organisation and the employee to determine an individuals employment status because it determines many things. If a person is self employed and you wish to offer them work then the Inland Revenue may not agree this and you would have to pay the tax and national insurance contributions to the Inland Revenue. If a person is classed as a worker then they are entitled to certain employment rights including the minimum wage. If a person is to be an employee then they have a wide range of employment rights opened up to them as well as being entitled to statutory sick pay and statutory redundancy pay should the occasion arise.

3. Examples of legislation that impact on peoples working hours It is vital that both Organisations and Employees respect the legislation that has been put in place to encourage a good healthy work and home life. This ensures organisations get the best from their employees. Employees and...
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