Supporting Equality and Inclusion

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Supporting equality and inclusion

The Children Act 2004 requires all Childminders “to treat all children as individuals and with equal concern”. Inclusion is the practice of treating all children as individuals and meeting their individual needs. An inclusive approach as a Childminder is important because every child learns in different ways and you need to recognise and meet these needs to provide a good service to the children in your care. It’s also important to help children recognise and respect differences between people and their cultural identities. Inclusive practice also helps the children and their parents feel welcome and respected in your setting irrespective of cultural background, ability or gender.

Children learn through play therefore it is important to reflect inclusion in the activities and toys that you provide for them to use. Play is important to children’s learning and development because it is how they learn to relate and act in the world around them. For an example of how I plan play that is challenging and enjoyable please see my daily, weekly and monthly plan

By observing children at play we can learn more about what a child’s needs are, as well as their likes and dislikes. You can learn what they can and can’t do as well as highlight areas of success and need for improvement and development. Once you have highlighted these areas and needs you can plan specific activities and challenges for the children. It is also important because with permission you can discuss issues with the child’s other childcare providers and gain a full understanding of where the child is at. You can also build a record of the child’s development with their parents so you can track their achievement, which is helpful so you can see how a child has progressed. An example of how observing children can help you learn about them is if you observe a child can put his shoes on, but not do the Velcro you can plan to give him more time to try the Velcro bit...
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