Supersize Me” Versus “Dying to Be Thin”

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“Supersize me” versus “Dying to be thin”

Over the last 20 years, obesity rates have doubled in adults, and tripled in Adolescents. More than 65% of Americans are now overweight or obese. How did we get to be so huge, and how can we fix it? We live in a very toxic food Environment, where we are consuming too much of the wrong foods, larger portions and high consumption of fast foods and processed foods... Our food choices are not only causing obesity rates to soar, but causing malnutrition among our children, and our society. On the other side of the story, as per Mayo clinic study, anorexia nervosa, also increasing by 36 percent every 5 years since 1950. The documentary film, “supersize me”, is “Morgan Spurlock’s” funny, surprising and thoroughly effective documentary about America's unhealthy love affair with fast food. The film is an experiment: What would happen if you ate nothing but McDonald's food, three meals a day, for an entire month? Spurlock does just this. His rules are that he must eat three meals a day, he can ONLY eat food from the McDonald's menu he must super-size when asked, and he must eat everything on the menu at least once He interviews the son of Robbins, who is now a health expert after having grown up on ice cream and feeling sick all the time. He investigates junk food in public schools, including the USDA-provided school lunches, which Spurlock discovers are nearly as unhealthy as letting kids choose items from vending machines. He goes to Texas, home to six of the nation's 20 fattest cities and he makes repeated phone calls to McDonald's headquarters to get their side of the story for the film. His calls are not returned. The most entertaining highlights, though, are of Spurlock eating, and trying to eat, and wishing he could stop eating, McDonald's food. We track his progress, his weight gain, his inability to walk up stairs easily, and his girlfriend reports on the sexual side effects. He learns the food has an addictive effect on him, and his teams of doctors -- who checked him out beforehand and pronounced him in fantastic health -- are positively STUNNED at the effects his insane diet produces. And in the documentary film, “Dying to be thin", In its exploration of anorexia and bulimia, Dying to Be Thin offers first-person accounts from people whose work makes them especially susceptible to eating disorders, particularly dancers, who are often expected to maintain their weight nearly 15 percent below the recommended ideal for their height. The program examines the roots of these disorders, the toll they take on the body and new, increasingly necessary treatments: According to a Mayo Clinic study, anorexia has been increasing by 36 percent every five years since the 1950s.Aneroxia and bulimia, a complex psychiatric disorder with its complex physical complications requires an interdisciplinary approach and treatment, including a psychiatrist, physicians, nurses, dietitians etc. This documentary features how the cultural, job related influences behind this eating disorders, and how adversely it affect people, how malnourished they are and how they lose their life in early age due to severe physical and, physiological complications. Both documentaries, centered to the extreme end of nutritional disorder, Obesity, and on the other end, anorexia and bulimia, but it has many similarities. Let us explore the similarities about these two documentaries. Similarities

I.Both are featuring about eating disorders, and both in one way or other deprive body’s nutrients. In the film, Supersize me” the diet is packed with only Trans and saturated fats. The diet is lacking, vitamins, minerals, fibers, which could have obtained from fruits, vegetables etc. In Dying to be thin”, all nutrients, body’s required fat, carbohydrate, protein, all energy yielding nutrients along with other microelements, vitamins, minerals are missing. Ultimately both documentaries pinpoint the importance of a good...
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