Summer Solstice

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* Change
1. a. To cause to be different: change the spelling of a word. b. To give a completely different form or appearance to; transform: changed the yard into a garden. 2. To give and receive reciprocally; interchange: change places. 3. To exchange for or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category: change one's name; a light that changes colors. 4.

a. To lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; switch: change methods; change sides. b. To transfer from (one conveyance) to another: change planes. 5. To give or receive the equivalent of (money) in lower denominations or in foreign currency. 6. To put a fresh covering on: change a bed; change the baby.

VERB:
intr.
1. To become different or undergo alteration: He changed as he matured. 2. To undergo transformation or transition: The music changed to a slow waltz. 3. To go from one phase to another, as the moon or the seasons. 4. To make an exchange: If you prefer this seat, I'll change with you. 5. To transfer from one conveyance to another: She changed in Chicago on her way to the coast. 6. To put on other clothing: We changed for dinner.

7. To become deeper in tone: His voice began to change at age 13. NOUN:
1. The act, process, or result of altering or modifying: a change in facial expression. 2. The replacing of one thing for another; substitution: a change of atmosphere; a change of ownership. 3. A transformation or transition from one state, condition, or phase to another: the change of seasons. 4. Something different; variety: ate early for a change. 5. A different or fresh set of clothing.

6.
a. Money of smaller denomination given or received in exchange for money of higher denomination. b. The balance of money returned when an amount given is more than what is due. c. Coins: had change jingling in his pocket.

7. Music
d. A pattern or order in which bells are rung.
e. In jazz, a change of harmony; a modulation.
8. A market or exchange where business is transacted.

* choice  

NOUN:
1. The act of choosing; selection.
2. The power, right, or liberty to choose; option.
3. One that is chosen.
4. A number or variety from which to choose: a wide choice of styles and colors. 5. The best or most preferable part.
6. Care in choosing.
7. An alternative.
ADJECTIVE:
choic·er, choic·est
1.
a. Of very fine quality.
b. Appealing to refined taste.
2. Selected with care.
3. Of the U.S. Government grade of meat higher than good and lower than prime.

IDIOM:
of choice
Preferred above others of the same kind or set: "the much used leveraged buyout as the weapon of choice" (Alison Leigh Cowan).

ETYMOLOGY:
Middle English chois, from Old French, from choisir, to choose, from Vulgar Latin *causre, of Germanic origin; see geus- in Indo-European roots

SYNONYMS:
choice, alternative, option, preference, selection, election

These nouns denote the act, power, or right of choosing. Choice implies broadly the freedom to choose from a set: The store offers a wide choice of vegetables. I had no choice in the matter. Alternative emphasizes choice between only two possibilities or courses of action: "An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth.... Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do" (Jane Austen). Option often stresses a power or liberty to choose that has been granted: The legislature outlined several tax options. Preference indicates choice based on one's values, bias, or predilections: We were offered our preference of wines. Selection suggests a variety of things or persons to choose from: The video store had a wide selection of foreign films. Election especially emphasizes the use of judgment: The university recommends the election of courses in literature. See...
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