Suicide Prevention

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Suicide Prevention
Each year, suicide in the United States is the cause of more deaths than homicide. Approximately 30,000 people each year commit suicide. Suicide is the third highest cause of death in ages 15-24. In children younger than 15, 1-2 out of every 100,000 will commit suicide (Caruso). Every year, approximately 750,000 people attempt suicide; failed attempts often result in permanent damage requiring long term permanent care (“America’s Mental Health Channel”). Suicide is relevant to almost everyone; the problem touches people of all ages, and most everyone knows a person who has committed suicide. Suicide must be addressed with the proper awareness and education. The military offers such programs as the Resiliency Camp to combat increasing rates within the military. The National Center for Suicide Prevention offers a free class for anyone, to help aide in the education with symptoms and causes. The numbers of attempted and successful suicides is a sobering reality that requires research. Studies indicate, “Over 90% of people who commit suicide had a mental illness at the time of the event” (Caruso). Depression left untreated is the number one cause of suicide; some people are genetically pre-disposed toward such depression, while others have a negative life experience that causes their depression. Negative life experiences could range from chronic illnesses, to divorce, or even violent acts against them or a loved one. Education can help those suffering

from suicidal tendencies: “Depression is highly treatable and is a chemical imbalance in the brain; if it lasts more than two weeks you need to seek help immediately” (Caruso). When symptoms occur in most people, they only last for a couple of days. When symptoms interfere with life and activities, depression is an immediate problem. Knowing signs can save a life. Some symptoms include: sleeping too much or too little, eating too much or too little, feeling...
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