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Sudden Awakening in Zen Buddhism

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Sudden Awakening in Zen Buddhism

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  • July 2009
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July 4th

Churchill Elangwe

Sudden awakening

All of us on this earth desire happiness and many of us go through great efforts to achieve that goal. Some look for happiness in material things, but are often disappointed because of the transitory nature of the material world. Others look to religion and spirituality for happiness, but too often their attempts fail because of the difficulties of most such paths and the lack of perseverance and discipline on part of the seekers.

It has been found that the energy that lies dormant in us, once awakened, can lead to eternal bliss and happiness. However, rigorous practice can be daunting for most of us, and as a result, most seekers using such methods fail to achieve the bliss and happiness they deserve. An example will be some one without patience would want to practice to the extreme in order to attain (satori) or sudden awareness, which is the key concept of Zen.

There are two type of processes that one can obtain awakening in Zen Buddhism. There is the sudden and gradual awakening. Sudden awakening is the type of awakening ordinary people directly access their source of wisdom and compassion within and to awaken by recognizing the true nature of one’s own mind. The approach is one of utilizing ones own inborn awareness in an atmosphere of wise guidance and compassionate support. Meanwhile the sudden awakening is a none traditional Buddhist tradition. It is spontaneous, lively and thoroughly modern while at the same time possessing a rich treasure of ancient tradition, lineage and wisdom

Hui-neng the famous sixth patriarch of the cha’n an illiterate monk who came from outside of the rigid hierarchical structure of gradual meditation practices, achieves the instantaneous awareness of the oneness of all reality. Nevertheless, he inherited the religious authority of the fifth patriarch. The head of the Buddhist order in china. The most famous incident in Hui-neng’s story concerns a dharma contest...

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