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  • Topic: Evelyn Waugh, Bright Young Things, Prime minister
  • Pages : 4 (1291 words )
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  • Published : April 8, 2013
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With emphasis on Vile Bodies and wider reference to Coming Up For Air, discuss how Waugh and Orwell criticise authority and support traditionalist and conservative values.

Vile Bodies is written in a radical, Cinematic structure that contradicts Waugh's Conservative politics ‘Outrage had finished dinner… Lottie and the king went in to dinner together… Upstairs at No. 12,’ whereas Coming Up For Air is written in a traditionalist style that contrasts Orwell's Socialist politics. Both books, although written a decade apart, predict war highlighting the collision course the traditional authorities are on. One of the main features in Coming Up For Air and many of Waugh's novels, such as Brideshead Revisited, is nostalgia and the loss of traditional values, warped by business and money ' bury something precious … where I've been happy …. [when] old and ugly and miserable, I could come back and dig it up and remember.', 'It's a wonderful thing to be a boy, go roaming where grown-ups can't catch you'. The two quotes show how the writers are haunted by adulthood, stopping them from being happy. Both novels are opinionated about the authorities and the decline in society, both satirise the traditional establishment being replaced by newspapers, business and money. The authorities in Vile Bodies are idle and unproductive. Prime Ministers change continuously and don't understand how to govern the country and could not keep their business out of the papers '...Knew the business of avoiding the undesirable publicity than Sir James Brown.', 'Last week's prime Minister... finished the last bottle.' showing Outrage to be doped and out of control. Being Foreign secretary, Outrage should be able to communicate with other countries- 'A poor conclusion for a former foreign secretary', this shows the government's incompetence with dealing with foreigners and women. The King of Ruritania, exiled after the war, this is a metaphor for the loss of a 'rural' 'Britannia'...
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