Study About Oregano

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  • Topic: Oregano, Bacteria, Marjoram
  • Pages : 6 (1343 words )
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  • Published : March 6, 2013
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OREGANO (ORIGANUM VULGARE) AS AN
ADDITIVE TO DISHWASHING LIQUID

A Research Study Presented to
MR. RAMACHANDRA TORRES
Of Tarlac State Uiversity
Laboratory High School

In Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirements for
Science Research I

By:
Ezikiel Kyle Mesina
John Leonard Dela Peña
Andrea Nicole Macam
Camille Ann Bognot
John Mathew Valencia
Gideon Mark Corpuz
Danielle Ann Lapitan
Katrine Mañalac

JANUARY 2012

CHAPTER 1

PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

INTODUCTION

Oregano is a plant that grows from 20–80 cm tall, with opposite heart-shaped leaves 3 to 9 cm long. Oregano flowers are purple, 3–4 mm long, produced in erect spikes. It is sometimes called wild marjoram. Oregano leaves and flowers are used as antiseptic for cuts and burns. Oregano contains thymol, a crystalline substance that has antiseptic and fungicide properties. The primary germ-killing part of oregano oil is a substance called carvacrol. Oregano is a traditional herb that has been used for thousands of years for natural immune support. New science continues to prove its broad power to be of help. Oil of oregano is known to be a rich source of the volatile oils thymol and carvacrol, which have been shown to be largely responsible for enabling oil of oregano to kill various microorganisms under experimental conditions.

A dishwashing liquid is to remove stains, loosens food remains enough so you can wipe it away with little effort, to kill bacteria that sticks in the container. It is a detergent used to assist in dishwashing. It is usually a highly-foaming mixture of surfactants with low skin irritation, and is primarily used for hand washing of glasses, plates, cutlery, and cooking utensils in a sink or bowl. The reduced surface tension of dishwashing water, and increasing solubility of modern surfactant mixtures, allows the water to run off the dishes in a dish rack very quickly. However, most people also rinse the dishes with pure water to make sure to get rid of any soap residue that could affect the taste of the food.

It is more popularly known for its aromatic and balsamic flavor and is commonly used as mint flavoring in Mediterranean and Mexican foods. Oregano as used as herbal medicine has its earliest beginnings even in early Egyptian times and has been traditionally used as herbal remedy for skin burns, cuts and bruises.

A just published study tested oregano oil and other essential oils against 10 human pathogenic bacteria including E.coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus.  Of all oils tested oregano had the highest and broadest germ-killing activity and carvacrol1 was shown to be the strongest anti-bacterial component in all oils tested.  Another study of oregano oil on Staphylococcus2 used an electron microscope to evaluate the bacterial cell after exposure to oregano oil.  The cell was significantly disturbed, indicating oregano oil’s ability to directly damage bacteria while at the same time reducing the ability of the bacteria to generate toxins that damage human health. Conducted by Byron J. Richards, Board Certified Clinical Nutritionist. The healing powers of oil of oregano were virtually unknown in North America until the early 1900’s, even though our ancestors have relied on its medicinal effects for thousands of years. Hippocrates wrote volumes on how to use this medicinal herb in the treatment of many conditions. In recent years, oil of oregano has been largely investigated for its antimicrobial properties. A unique blend of oil of oregano known as the P73 wild oregano blend has been the subject of several recent investigative studies, which have examined its ability to kill various viruses, bacteria, yeasts and other microorganisms that are known to adversely affect human health. The fungal fighting properties of P73 wild oil of oregano are supported by research conducted at the Georgetown University Medical Center and led by Harry G. Preuss, M.D. The study,...
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