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Student Press Censorship

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Student Press Censorship

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  • July 29, 2013
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Table of Contents Censorship in American Public Schools; Two Examples: The Catcher in the Rye and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn I. II. Purpose Introduction a. A Brief History of Censorship b. First occurrence of censorship in America III. Censors a. Teachers as Censors b. Parents as Censors c. Librarians as Censors d. Effects of Censorship on Students IV. Censorship a. Reasons Books are Censored b. First Amendment and Free Speech V. VI. Censoring Two Classics Censorship of The Catcher in the Rye a. Language b. Sexuality c. Reasons to Teach VII. Censorship of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn a. Language 1 1 2 3 3 5 7 8 9 12 13 13 15 17 18 20 22 23 25

b. Racism c. Reasons to Teach VIII. IX. Conclusion Recommendations

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Censorship in American Public Schools; Two Examples: The Catcher in the Rye and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Purpose Censorship is apparent in a variety of domains such as music, television, politics, news, and books. The purpose of this study is to examine censorship through texts in secondary English classrooms. By studying the history and reasons for censorship of two American classic novels, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Catcher in the Rye, one may see these patterns of censored texts as they have evolved over the last century. The study will examine what is censored and who the censors are by concentrating on issues of language, sexuality, and racism. Introduction Censorship is an issue that has been debated for many years. Society places importance on censoring certain materials; public schools do as well. Furthermore, public schools play a large part in censoring books. Therefore studying the role that schools play in censoring provides information about censoring in general. Social climate frequently changes. Furthermore, society is often guided by trends and fads. While public schools are not separate from society, they are more or less stable because of tradition. Often public schools...