Student-Centered Activities for Teaching Vocabulary

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 526
  • Published : January 3, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Applied Foreign Languages
English Methodology

Student-Centered Activities for Teaching Vocabulary
Student: Emilija Georgievska
Academic Supervisor: Senior Lecturer Iskra Stamenkoska, MA

December, 2012
Skopje

Table of contents
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………….3 Useful Student-Centered Vocabulary Strategies and Activities………………......................4 Applying the Suggested Strategies and Activities at Upper-Intermediate English Class.......9 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………...13 References……………………………………………………………………………………14

Introduction

The student-centered approach in teaching has become very popular during 1970s-1980s. According to Sandra J. Savignon, the impact of learner-centeredness in language teaching was evident with the development of communicative approaches which shifted the attention of the teaching-learning processes from language form to language function, or to language use in accordance with the needs of learners. This approach was so revolutionary mainly because it changed the focus in the classroom, by making students more active participants in the learning process and by changing the role a typical teacher would usually have. As a trend in contemporary English language teaching pedagogies it focused on developing learners’ communicative competence and on promoting learning strategies and learner autonomy in language classrooms. The abundant research and analysis of this method has resulted in a variety of techniques and principles that are widely used in each stage of education, for different types of curricula. Some of the most beneficial contributions of the learner centered instruction are the creation of a classroom atmosphere where the teacher acts as a facilitator rather than an instructor and the students are encouraged to work in pairs, groups and as a whole class. As a matter of fact, we have all witnessed pair work and group work in different courses and with different professors. As Graham Rogers puts it: “student-centred learning is designed to put more responsibility on the learners for their own learning. It involves students in more decision-making processes, and they learn by doing, rather than just by listening and performing meaningless tasks which are often not in context and therefore ‘unreal’ to them. Because learning becomes more active (rather than passively listening to the teacher), it becomes more memorable: because it is personalised, and relevant to the students’ own lives and experiences, it brings language ‘alive’, and makes it relevant to the real world”. The main point in a student centered classroom is that the student is the revolving spot around which the lessons are tailored. They should be organized according to the learners’ needs and preferences as much as possible, with the help of a suitable textbook. That is why terms such as ‘learner autonomy’ and’ learning by doing’ have become a must in every type of instruction based on the student centered method, both of which enhance the independence of the learner and promote their motivation and interest. What is of greater importance in this paper is how student centered instructions can help improve the acquisition of English language vocabulary in an ESL/EFL classroom. The advantages of this approach have been obvious in various different fields of teaching, so it comes somewhat natural to assume that these same techniques would also bring benefit in an English teaching classroom. Activities such as these, where students are actively involved in the process of learning have proven to be very helpful in terms of teaching vocabulary as well. In the following text, we will see some useful strategies and activities for teaching vocabulary in a student-centered classroom. After that, I will try to implement the given activities in a lesson plan where a specific vocabulary exercise was mainly teacher-centered, showing how can it...
tracking img