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Floods are the most frequent type of disaster worldwide. They can strike anywhere at anytime. Although floods can be predicted, they often cause massive damage and destruction of property. The typical effects of a flood are broken down into three sections. The Primary Effects are physical damage and casualties. The Secondary Effects include damaged water supplies, diseases, crops and food disruption, and The Tertiary Effect better known as the long-term effects are economic effects. The Primary Effects of a flood consist of physical damage and casualties. The physical damage can have effects on structures such as bridges, cars, buildings, sewer systems, and roadways. A flood can also put an entire community underwater destroying houses and cars leaving people with nothing. Many people become homeless due to property loss, which can be one of the greatest effects of flooding. Another big effect for many people may be the malfunction of city facilities, which may be unusable until they are cleaned or repaired. City streets and highways may become unusable as they fill with tons of debris. Drowning casualties include people and livestock and can affect family and friends. The loss of livestock can have an effect on the famer’s income and cause lack of food for others. Both physical damage and casualties play a huge roll on peoples everyday lives. The Secondary Effect has a lot to do with water supplies, diseases, crops and food supplies. A flood may damage a city’s water and sewage facilities and cause water contamination making clean drinking water scarce. Floodwaters may cause high levels of raw sewage or other hazardous substances and in some cases overflowing treatment facilities forcing authorities to issue boil water orders killing all major waste-borne bacterial pathogens within the water. Clean drinking water and food supply are both essential parts of life that have major effects on people’s lives and why we see so many casualties after a flood. The...
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