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String Theory

By | May 2005
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String theory is defined by Merriam-Webster as, "A physical theory in which one-dimensional loops travel through space and also merge and lyse as time elapses. This is in contrast to ordinary quantum field theory, which predicts point particles that emit and absorb each other. String theory is a candidate for a Theory of Everything." String theory would solve the long fight between Einstein's theory of relativity and Quantum Physics.

String theory proclaims that everything in our universe, from stars and suns to apples and atoms, is made up of incredibly small particles called strings. Strings are so small, that if an atom were the size of our solar system, a string would be the size of a tree. There are six different string theories. Each is classified by a type; Bosonic, IIA, HO, HE… Each has its own way of explaining what strings are, and how the make up our regular life objects. But each theory uses the basic structure illustrated by the picture at right.

Each object in the universe that we know of, from gum to galaxies is made up of atoms. In turn, each atom is made up of protons and neutrons, which have electrons circling their nucleus. For as long as we have known about them, scientists have pictured atoms, and the quarks that make them, as balls. String theory proclaims that there are tiny vibrating strings instead of these balls. It says that each string vibrates at different wavelengths, and that is what makes up our universe. Strings are easily and often compared to the strings on a musical instrument, such as a guitar. On a guitar, each string makes a certain note, depending on the speed it vibrates at. The shorter the string, the faster it vibrates, producing a higher note. Strings do almost the exact same thing; depending on which theory you look at. In some string theories, strings are defined as one-dimensional non-looping objects, but in most, they are shown as one-dimensional loops. The reason why string theory is so revolutionary is...
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