Stress/ Health Profile

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 67
  • Published : October 18, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Applying Psychology to Your Life: Developing your Stress/Health Profile Melinda Stewart
National University
Stress is something unavoidable in our lives. After taking the scales and scoring what I cannot say, I was surprised with my results. There were eight scales that we had to take and then score. With this process, we then create our own stress profile. The first scale was “Stressed Out” on this I scored 23. I compared my score to the examples given in age, gender, and marital status. I scored above average and I would consider myself stressed more so than others. On the second scale, “Susceptibility to Stress” I scored 24. This scale indicated I was not susceptible to stress. I did not agree with this finding. Although on paper and this scale says otherwise I feel differently and believe I am. On the third scale “Response to Stress,” I scored 88. The findings from this scale suggest excessive physical stress symptoms and take action to reduce stress from the possibility of psychophysiological disorder. I have taken action and I am currently seeking medical help as well as dissecting my stressors and reducing them. The fourth scale “Type A or Type B” was an interesting result for me. I discovered I am a Type A personality. In out textbook it describes (Type A individuals are more often “combat ready”) Myers, 2009. It also talks about how Type A personalities are more prone to heart attacks than a Type B would be. My Fifth scale “Coping with Stress” I realize I am an Active-cognitive (active efforts to construct thought to help cope with the problems) scoring 23. I do tend analyze situations and figure out solutions. On the sixth scale “Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales” I scored the highest on the last six item is which measure chance health locus of control, (health is due to fate, luck, or chance.) I do not know if that actually correct for me. I know that genetics and other factors may control health. The seventh scale “Locus of Control” I scored 41. Source: Paulhus, D.(1983). Sphere-specific measures of perceived control, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 44, 1253-1265. My eighth and final scale “Scheirer & Carver’s Life Orientation Test” I scored 22. The mean score is approximately 21 so I consider myself about as optimistic as the average person. I like to believe the good outweighs the bad in life. Many of the stressors in my life started at an early age. I found out I was pregnant in my teenage years. Having a baby when I was still a child was one of the biggest stressors that I have had to deal with. I needed to grow up, fast, and figure out how to support myself and a baby without the help of my parents. I was constantly worried about work, bills and if this was the right thing to do in my life. Having had to grow up fast, being so young made me learn how to cope with other life stressors that have popped up in my life over time. Looking back on my childhood, I had a parent who lacked in the ability to foster a positive emotional bond. My father lacked in the department of being a parent, I was never a priority. I could feel that from a very young age I was a mistake and learned ways to cope with the stress of trying to please my dad. I would seek out attention from other parents whenever I felt the need. I had to suffer as a child-knowing deep down how my dad felt about me. This was a life’s lesson on what I want to teach my child and how I wanted to let him know he was loved. I did not want him growing up with unnecessary stress and life’s hassles that a parent can cause their child from early on. I knew the impact it had on me my entire life and how it can cause depression like it did in me. I deal with serious issues in life because of my childhood and it affects my marriage as well. I lack in communication skills when it comes to life’s stressors and hide away alone when I cannot...
tracking img