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The Strengths and weaknesses of Antigone In "Antigone" by Sophocles.

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The Strengths and weaknesses of Antigone In "Antigone" by Sophocles.

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  • November 21, 2005
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Usually, in novels, the main character's strength overshadows his weaknesses. In the Greek tragedy "Antigone", however, the main character of the same name has as many strong points as weak ones. In the next paragraphs, I will point out Antigone's strengths, weaknesses and, finally, the evolution of the character throughout the play.

It goes without saying that Antigone is an extremely strong woman for her time and even for ours. She does have evident strengths. Throughout the play, she stands her ground very well and has no change of heart or mind. She knows what she wants and does whatever she has to in order to get it. She wants to honor her brother with a proper burial and also please the Gods, which means she has her values set in order (Family and Religion) Even after her sisters warnings and Creon's threats, she does not change her mind, which means that she's not easily pressured. She knows the consequence of her acts yet still decides to go through with them, which makes her an incredibly courageous woman.

A person can't be flawless, and Antigone is far from it. Even with all her strengths, she has many weaknesses. For one, she overlooks other people's feelings. During the play, she causes the death of three people: herself, Haemon & Haemons mother. During the whole ordeal, she only thought about herself and her mission, disregarding other people's feelings. She knew she was going to die for her actions and even said it to Ismene, but she failed to think of what was going to happen to her fiancé, her sister and the family in general. In addition, her sisters' refusal to help her did anger her, but what even made her angrier was the fact that she pleaded guilty when Creon accused her of helping Antigone. She did not want anybody else sharing the blame and, at the same time, the pride of doing what she did. In the end, she wanted her fifteen minutes of fame more than anything. In my opinion, she does it more out of duty to the Gods than for love of...