Street Wear

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  • Topic: Skinhead, Elegant Gothic Aristocrat, Fashion
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  • Published : October 17, 2012
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INDEPENDENT STUDY

STREET WEAR

Submitted by:
Krishna kumar gupta
F &LA

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I, Krishna Kumar Gupta of F&LA would take this opportunity to show my sincere gratitude to my mentor Mr. N. Vennimalai, whose guidance helped us understand the subject better. I would like to thank my department who was present whenever any help was needed and my group mates of the group assignment that we shared.

CONTENTS
HISTORY
TRIBAL STREETWEAR
TRIBAL ARTISTS AND INFLUENCE
MODERN URBAN STREETWEAR
INTERNATIONAL INFLUENCE
INFLUENCE OF STREET WEAR IN FASHION
STREETWEAR HISTORY WITH FATS “FATSARAZZI” SHARIFF
JAPANESE STREET FASHION
MODERN JAPANESE STREET FASHION
FASHION INDUSTRY AND POPULAR BRANDS IN JAPAN
STREET FASHION AND INFLUENCE OF SUBCULTURE ON STREET FASHION •STREET WEAR FASHION IN USA
JAPANESE STREET WEAR FASHION
LONDON STREET WEAR FASHION
INDIAN FASHION AND INFLUENCE OF STREET FASHION ON IT
INDIAN STREET FASHION
CONCLUSION

History
As we looked back into the history of street wear we traced the beginning back to Shawn Stussy, the local surfboard shaper of Laguna Beach. His logo began of the surfboards that he shaped until 1980 when he translated it to T-shirts. These became instantly popular with all the local skaters and grew to worldwide fame from there. Perhaps the most amazing thing that came of Stussy is what makes street wear what it is today, which is even as the popularity grows is seems to remain as something underground. Many have attributed this to how street wear has become a subculture, one that emphasizes that the independents rule. The most popular street wear sites, stores, and brands have steered away from being bought out by million dollar corporations making it mainstream. Even numerous boutiques are phasing out the large corporate brands, while keeping their support to the independent brands.

Shawn Stussy started the movement of the surfer from California expressing himself through his clothes, which led to the hip-hop culture getting involved. In that time period the African Americans had no voice in the media nor were they being marketed to. Fashion was used as a form of art, expression, and communication. Without mainstream media, this underground movement marketed itself through the droves of individuals with their street clothes. Hip-Hop encouraged all to self-expression and that is what street wear has become, the clothing maker expresses something they feel but when you put it on it becomes you. Something that you have to say.

All though the surf, skate, and hip-hop community all had their roots in street wear. Japan emerged on the scene in the 1980's as well. The Japanese youth wanted everything American, however, by the early 1990's they were helping pioneer the way to what street wear has become. Brands like BAPE and Real Mad Hectic became trendsetters by coming out with limited edition apparel, with background stories, and very high price points. These factors led to obsessive followings, where many claim Asia/Japan get all the great sneakers and apparel.

These three movements have continued to progress into what street wear is today but street wear finds its roots in these movements. Movements that have been led by a non-mainstream subculture of self-expression and individuality. Huge numbers of people find brands that are not even marketed heavily, creating the street wear phenomenon that we live in today.

Bobby Ruiz started Tribal Street wear on the 20th of November in 1989 with his brother Joey. When Bobby was looking for sponsors for a graffiti art/benefit show in San Diego, Carl Arellano, who had a silk screening business offered to sponsor the show. "It was at that point when we became friends and started to talk about him getting involved with Tribal", says Bobby. Bobby had a concept with artwork. Both Joey and Bobby...
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