Street Drugs

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 198
  • Published : September 12, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Street Drugs|
Research Writing By:|
Christine |


Street drugs can be very harmful to a body if they are not aware of the effects of what they are and what

they can to do it. To show how street drugs can damage a body and why these drugs need to be off the street,

children at young ages need to be taught what these different types of drugs are and the meanings of them.

This should be taught throughout all schools including colleges because even college people are able to be

under pressure and feel the need to try and find a way to keep up with their schooling. In the end it only hurts

their minds and could even worse end them up in much more trouble. Our goal would be to find a way to get

these street drugs off the street. There are so many bad street drugs out there that maybe just a little word to

our children and friends will help keep him or her safe.

Harry Jacob Aslinger, who helped make the United States Drug Policy from (1930-1962) (King, and

McDonough, JR, 2001), was a part of developing the drug policy because he saw what morphine had done to

his neighbor lady when he was a young child and it made a lifelong impression on him that made him want

to do something about it. When he was old enough he went to college and worked for the railroads part-

time. Even though he never graduated, in the 1920s, the Prohibition Amendment had made the importing,

manufacture, or sale of alcoholic beverages illegal throughout the United States and its’ possessions other

than what could be used for medical or sacramental purposes. “The Volstead Act (1919) and the Harrison

Act (1914), aimed respectively at enforcing Prohibition and controlling the distribution of narcotic drugs,

were both tax measures, and hence came within the jurisdiction of the U.S. Treasury Department”. (King,

and. McDonugh, JR, 2001)

Some of the street drugs that can cause people to change the way they behave are “acid, angel dust, and

vitamin K.” (Leshner, 2007) All three of these can cause a person to change the way they think, behave and

even communicate in a bad way sometimes if the drug reacts or is taken for long periods. There is a

Hallucinogen called LSD that basically reacts just as it seems but can be very dangerous. It makes a person

hallucinate and think frightening thoughts. “LSD also has long after affects that a person can have

psychotic-like episodes and PCP and ketamine can cause respiratory depression, heart rate abnormalities, and

a withdrawal syndrome”. (Leshner, 2007) LSD is used more in night-clubs and raves. LSD is a white or

clear water-soluble material that usually starts to work within thirty to ninety minutes and can last up to

twelve hours. Usually the more they do, the more it takes for it to work. Some other side effects of LSD are

“loss of appetite, dry mouth, increased blood pressure and heart rate.” (Leshner, 2007)

“PCP was developed in the 1950s as an intravenous surgical anesthetic, is classified as a dissociative

anesthetic”. (Leshner, 2007) PCP was used in veterinary, but it was never approved to be used for humans

because of its effects. A drug call PCP and ketamine can make a body believe it is out of control so the

body has no idea what it is doing when taking this drug. PCP became a pill form in the 1960s and then a

powder form in the 1970s in which people put it on marijuana, tobacco or parsley then smoked it to get rapid

effects. This is why people normally smoke or snort PCP. They want quick effects. PCP can usually last

for hours and it can affect several functions of the body. For instance, if a “body does a low dose something

that can happen are shallow, rapid breathing, increased blood pressure and heart rate, and elevated

temperature. If a body has a higher dose it can cause dangerous...
tracking img