Stolen Generation

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1) Analyse one of race, class foreign policy (or another topic of your choice) as an enduring theme in Australian politics

‘The Stolen Generation’, is an enduring theme in Australian politics. This theme has been ongoing from the time the British Settlers arrived in Australia on the 26th January 1788 and can be seen continuing throughout politics through to the 21st Century. Some people refer to it as one of the darkest chapters of Australian history as it was the forced removal of Aboriginal children from their families. Children as young as babies were stolen from their families to be placed in girls and boys homes, foster families or missions. At the age of 18 they were 'released' into white society, often scarred for life by their experiences. Today these Aboriginal people are collectively known as the 'Stolen Generations' because several generations were affected. (Macintyre, 2009) Although this occurred many years ago and such practices would not exist within today’s society, many people are still being affected by this experience. It caused a lot of controversy throughout politics as many people debated whether or not the Australian Government should apologise to the Aboriginal people. The following list of events help to prove that this issue is an enduring theme in Australian politics.

In 1869, the Victorian Board for the protection of Aborigines is established. This allowed the Governor to order the removal of any child to a reformatory or industrial school. The Protection Board can remove children from station families to be held in dormitories. Following Victoria, was New South Wales in 1883, then Queensland in 1897, Western Australia in 1905 and then South Australia in 1905. (Aboriginal Culture, n.d.) Come 1915 the NSW Aborigines Protection Board is given powers to remove Aboriginal children without a court hearing. This power is repealed in 1940, when the Board is renamed the Aborigines Welfare Board. (Aboriginal Culture, n.d.)...
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