Stockholm Syndrome

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Child abuse, Abuse, Kidnapping of Jaycee Lee Dugard
  • Pages : 4 (988 words )
  • Download(s) : 231
  • Published : October 8, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
| |

Stockholm Syndrome

Brian Perry – G00059466

CJ416 Victimology

25 OCT 2010


Why is Stockholm Syndrome so prevalent in child abduction cases? What happens to the victim psychologically, emotionally, and physically during their captivity. How do they cope with the crisis they are dealing with? The Stockholm Syndrome is a coping mechanism hat allows victims the ability to deal with their captivity. It essentially becomes a bond with their captors and the feelings of helplessness are less avowed due to the reliance on them for support and also out of initial fear. We will examine this issue and also will include one case that is well known and just happened recently in the US.

Stockholm Syndrome describes the behavior of kidnap victims who, over time, become sympathetic to their captors. The name derives from a 1973 hostage incident in Stockholm, Sweden. At the end of six days of captivity in a bank, several kidnap victims actually resisted rescue attempts, and afterwards refused to testify against their captors. The behavior is considered a common survival strategy for victims of interpersonal abuse, and has been observed in battered spouses, abused children, prisoners of war, and concentration camp survivors.

Effects on a child: When a child is abducted, depending on the age, they may or may not develop a fight or flight response. Many children, after the initial shock and fear of the abduction, begin to become dependent on their abductors for survival. Many children fear never seeing their family again for fear of their family being harmed if they try to...
tracking img