Steve Jobs, a Summary of an Epic Life

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Steve Jobs, the man who put a dent in the universe.

By Baldur Kjelsvik

What man could possibly change how people use personal computers, phones and listen to music in a lifetime? Steve Jobs believed he could, and proved not to fail.

Five decades ago, a man that should completely renovate big part of every ones life, was born. This man was Steve Paul Jobs, and he changed the world. The following text is a summary of his life and his importance to the society.

Mister Jobs was a rebel. A shocker? Not really, it is the crazy ones who make an impact. He was a problem-maker in school, and he got expelled several times. As a 17-year-old, the guy went on a psychedelic adventure in India – shaved his head and found him inner self. Following high school graduation in the early 70s, Jobs enrolled at Reed College, a favourite among the hippies. Although he dropped out after only a year, he continued to participate on several classes he found interesting. He pretty much did what ever he wanted.

He was known for being a rude, and often times unbearably mean man with serious lack of social-skills. He was often high on LSD, which he later said was one of the top three most significant things he did in his life, and frequently “far off”. His lack of an education and social intellect would not become an obstacle in his way for success; he only needed the right friends.

Steve Wozniak – a true computer-genius, was a man Jobs found interest in. A rebel in his own way, Wozniak was – tricking teachers and elderly with childish and harmless pranks. The two Steve’s were both brilliant and geniuses in their own respect. They became partners: Wozniak was the nerdy engineer, and Jobs the guy who knew how to wrap the technology into a cute box, make it human friendly and sell it to the general people. They would very soon start Apple, a branding name now bigger than “Disney”.

In the garage of Mr Jobs’ stepdad, the two brilliant minds invented “Apple I”. This was the start of something big, and only few years later the company had made more machines and grown a huge fan base. Apple released their next computer – “Apple II” which sold millions, even though Jobs hated it. It was a fantastic computer with all the ports and extensions the nerds wanted, but he did not share the joy – the design did not correspond to his way of thinking. He wanted simple and clean – a typical Zen-philosophy. Wozniak, on the other hand, wanted possibilities to extend the potential of the machine, and have a customizable design. Some people agreed with Wozniak’s philosophy, other with Jobs’. A spiteful tension began to develop within the company, and Apple got dived into several divisions.

One section worked on the Apple II, which frankly was the machine that held Apple in an economic balance, another worked on the overly expensive and poor selling “Lisa”, and the final section worked on Steve Jobs new darling – the Macintosh.

Jobs had recently seen the commercial potential of Xerox PARC’s mouse-driven graphical user interface, a completely new type of operating system. As Picasso, the artist, once said: “Good artists copy; great artists steal”, and steal it Mr. Jobs did. Steve had paid the developers of Xerox’s operating system, just to see what kind of magic this graphical user interface was all about. Steve loved it, and made a similar product, with a few enhancements.

Only a few months later Apple released a Lisa, a computer with an operating system one could use almost without reading in the manual beforehand. Sadly, Lisa cost $10.000 (year 1983) and was way too expensive for the average-Joe. But Steve did not care; he was way into another project – the Macintosh.

In 1984 Apple aired a Super Bowl television commercial titled “1984”. The film used an unnamed heroine to represent the coming of the Macintosh as a means of saving humanity from conformity –”Big Brother”/IBM the at the time biggest computer-company. These images were a...
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