Stem Cell Research

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s): 95
  • Published: June 2, 2012
Read full document
Text Preview
Stem Cell Transplants
Team E
Devry University

By: Team E
Table of Contents
Stem Cell Transplants3
I.Description of stem cell research3
II.The historical development of stem cell research6
III.Economic questions and considerations12
IV.Political and legal influences19
V.Psychological considerations and sociological effects25
VI.The technology in its cultural context, media influence33
VII.Implications of the environment40
The Animal Testing Debate40
Animal Cloning for Food Products41
Effects of Chemicals and Toxins42
Stem Cells and Plants44
VIII.Moral and ethical implications45
IX.Conclusion55
Resources57

Stem Cell Transplants
Even though stem cell research is a new emerging technology, it has already had a major impact on the world. From the common person to the million dollar celebrity, stem cell research has touched many lives. Even if it has not made a direct impact in someone’s life, many people have at least heard or read of its influence on someone else. Most people also have already formed an opinion as to where they stand on the controversial issue of stem cell research and stem cell treatments. I. Description of stem cell research

New treatment possibilities with revolutionary ideas about those treatments are expected soon from researchers. The key to these promises of revolutionary new treatments is the human stem cell. With this key, biological mysteries that have been longstanding could be solved. Diseases could be eliminated and human suffering could end. With a promise of the ability to grow all of our body's tissues through a differentiation process, cells that do not yet have a developed specific function can develop into needed cells for our bodies to heal themselves from disease or injuries. Imagine a world without disease and without debilitating injuries. We could all live longer and healthier lives with this emerging technology. Embryonic stem cells are defined as undifferentiated cells, ones that can grow into any type of cell that it is introduced to and they are showing promises in treatments for many diseases such as cancer, spinal cord injuries, heart disease, Parkinson's disease and even diabetes. Applications of stem cell research to repair tissues that have been damaged have created a new specialty in medicine called regenerative medicine. Regenerative medicine is a biomedical approach to clinical therapies that involve the use of stem cells. Red and white blood cells, as well as platelets are produced from stem cells. When bone marrow stem cells are destroyed to treat diseases or are not functioning well they need replaced with new stem cells. A procedure to harvest healthy donor stem cells from blood or bone marrow is injected into the veins of the recipient. The injected cells travel in your blood to reach the bone cavities. These new cells aren't expected to function properly for about a month. If the bone marrow cells start producing healthy red and white blood cells and platelets the transplant is considered successful. There are many reasons why this procedure is done. When the stem cells in bone marrow are deficient or simply not functioning because of blood disorders, cancers, severe anemia, cancer treatments, infections or immunodeficiency disorders to name a few, new stem cells may be needed to help the body to regenerate tissue become healthy again. As with any procedure there are possible complications which the doctor should review with the patient. It is important for the patient to take the time to really understand everything about the procedure chosen, including any risks, benefits and of course any possible complications that go along with the planned treatment or therapy. The complications are different for the recipient and for the donor. All risks and possible complications should be thoroughly discussed with the doctor before agreeing to a transplant as a donor or as a...
tracking img