Status of Women in Society

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Status of women in society

As a woman I have no country. As a woman I want no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.”  Virginia Woolf God has created every thing in pair. He has blessed man with physical erudite and women with the spirutal power. Which make women more emotionally strong caring loving and whizz full person. One must not forget that every legend is once a student of mother as Napoleon said “Give me strong mothers and I will give you unbeatable army”. All over the world, women have played significant roles in their countries' development. They have contributed to the economic growth of their country by taking care of their families and working in and owning businesses. They have worked as doctors, teachers, electricians and artists. Women have even been prime ministers of countries. Unfortunately, not every society values the role women play and the contribution they make to their country's development. Some beliefs and practices create societies in which males play the dominant role. Religious traditions can contribute to making women second-class citizens. Low education levels and the tendency for women to have low self-confidence also contributes. In society, men tend to be the owners of property and the decision makers in the families. Women often stay at home, cleaning, cooking and caring for their children. Although these activities are essential for the well being of the family, women are often not respected for their work. Many times, when women venture out of the home to take part in other types of activities, such as going to school, owning businesses and participating in politics, they are often held back or discouraged. This unit focuses on the challenges women face in improving their lives and their standing in society. It is important to note, that the challenges women face in society are common around the world. Women in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas all face similar difficulties. A Women and Today’s Society Throughout history, men have traditionally been regarded as superior to women in both power and status. A common view in most societies was that daughters should obey their fathers and wives should obey their husbands, and this view still holds true in most Eastern countries. Recently, however, feminists in Western societies have fought against the societal structures that have allowed men to be dominant over women. Much has been accomplished; women, for example, are now attending colleges and graduate schools in record numbers. Between the years of 1987 and 1997, there was a 68 percent increase in the number of women entering graduate schools, whereas there was only a 22 percent increase in the number of men (NCES). In addition, the number of women in the workforce has increased significantly. Sixty-three million women were actively a part of the work force in 1997, an increase of 342 percent from similar data presented from 1950 (AFL-CIO). Since the early days of the Industrial Revolution women in Europe and North America have made considerable progress towards equality with men, although much remains still to be done. Of course, the industrialization of Western countries at first had not improved the status of women, but had degraded them even further by exploiting them and their children in factories as cheap labor. In the preceding relatively prosperous agrarian culture women had worked on an almost equal footing with men and had been skilled in many occupations. Families were still "producing units", and women received recognition for contributing their substantial share. The factory system changed all that by breaking up the traditional extended family with its large household and by giving people specialized monotonous tasks behind perpetually moving machines. Women and children were, however, paid much less for such...
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