Staffing an Organization

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Human Resource Management
Staffing the Organization
Bryant Cozart
University of Maryland University College

Table of Contents

Human Resource Management3
Job Analysis3
Internal Recruiting6
External Recruiting7
Web-based Recruiting8

Human Resource Management
Staffing the Organization
Human Resource Management is designing management systems to ensure that human talent is used effectively and efficiently to accomplish organizational goals (Mathis & Jackson, 2008). To that end, Human Resource Management activities include strategic human resource management, equal employment opportunity, staffing, talent management, total rewards, risk management and worker protection, employee and labor relations. This paper will discuss human resource management staffing activities as it relates to job analysis, recruiting, and selection.

External environmental factors such as political, social, legal, economic, and technological requirement affect staffing within organizations. The aim of staffing is to provide a sufficient supply of qualified individuals to fill jobs in an organization (Mathis & Jackson, 2008). Human resource managers determine job requirements by conducting job analysis and then formulating plans to fill these positions. Organizations need to have the right person, with the right capabilities, at the right time, and in the right place to accomplish its organizational mission.

Job analysis is the first step in this process. It involves a systematic review of the organization’s requirement for human capital. Job analysis refers to the process of collecting and analyzing information about the tasks, responsibilities, and the content of jobs (Marchington & Wilkinson, 2005). Human resource managers use varying methods to conduct job analysis. Some of the methods are questionnaires, interviews, observation, and logs or diaries. Questionnaires are a widely used method of gathering information on jobs. The questionnaire method offers a major advantage in that information on a large number of jobs can be collected inexpensively in a relatively short period of time (Mathis & Jackson, 2008). Normally a questionnaire will cover the duties and percentage of time spent on each, supervision that is given to others, any decisions that were made. Questionnaires will also cover what you have with other people, any physical demands related to the job, and the knowledge, skills, and abilities associated with the position. There are drawbacks with using the questionnaire method. It assumes that an employee can accurately analyze and communicate information about their job. Interviewing is the next method used when conducting a job analysis. The interview method of gathering information may require a manager to visit each job site and talk with the employees performing each job (Mathis & Jackson, 2008). The advantage of this method is that it allows the employee to describe tasks and duties that are not observable. A disadvantage of this method is that an employee may exaggerate or omit some tasks and duties. With the observation method, an employee performing their jobs enables the trained job analyst to obtain first-hand knowledge and information about the job being analyzed. The observation method of job analysis is suited for jobs in which the work behaviors are 1) observable involving some degree of movement on the part of the incumbent, or 2) job tasks are short in duration allowing for many observations to be made in a short period of time or a significant part of the job can be observed in a short period of time, or 3) jobs in which the job analyst can learn information about the job through observation (personal communication, October 22, 2009). The...
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