Staff Briefing

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Team Briefing Guidelines

A guide to team briefing at the University of Limerick

Approved July 2011

Contents

INTRODUCTION3

What is team briefing?3

The benefits of team briefing3

The team briefing process4

The team briefing timeline4

The team briefing calendar 2011/125

Guidelines for delivering team briefings5

Guidelines for receiving team briefings7

Monitoring the team briefing process7

Appendix 1: Recording notes8

Appendix 2: Recording feedback9

Appendix 3: Frequently asked questions10

Introduction

Welcome to the online guide to team briefing at the University of Limerick (UL). The guide describes the team briefing process and how to engage in it – whether you are a manager[1] with responsibility for delivering a team briefing or a recipient of a briefing.

While these guidelines try to cover most points, there may be issues relevant to your area of work or specific responsibility as a manager that are not covered here. If you feel you need further information or advice, you should approach your line manager for clarification. If you have any general questions about team briefing or any of the points raised in this guide, please contact the Human Resources Division by emailing Valerie.Nolan@ul.ie

What is team briefing?

In simple terms, team briefing brings managers together with their teams on a face-to-face basis so that information can be delivered, questions asked and feedback collected.

A team briefing system is an excellent way to enable communication upwards, downwards and sideways throughout an organisation. Research has shown that face-to-face communication between managers and their teams is vital to the efficient and effective operation of an organisation. UL is a large and complex institution undergoing a great deal of change, so face-to-face communication is essential in this environment. Staff members need to have a clear understanding of their role, the wider objectives of the team and the contribution they can make to the University’s future and vision.

Team briefing is an ideal way to deliver important messages to employees. It’s an ideal forum for discussions, questions, contributions, sharing good news and celebrating achievements. Team briefing also provides an opportunity for feedback to be recorded and relayed back up the organisation to the appropriate management levels. Briefings are not designed for consultation, negotiation or ‘collective discipline’.

Team briefing will only work if everyone involved in the process is committed to making it work. If you are a manager with responsibility for delivering a team brief, it is your job to make sure that everyone on your team fully understands what team briefing is about and why they are taking part in the process. If you are a recipient of team briefing, your role is to listen, ask questions and give constructive feedback.

The benefits of team briefing

Team briefing:
• Provides a channel for delivering clear messages and encouraging open communication • Prevents rumour and the grapevine from gaining credibility • Is a great form of two-way communication – it’s not just about informing people; it’s also about listening and responding to questions and concerns • Enables questions and suggestions to be fed back from staff to the top • Develops greater awareness and involvement at all levels • Develops a shared sense of mission, vision and collective aims • Ensures less misunderstanding within your team and other parts of the University • Keeps staff up to date on performance, results, progress and policy changes

The team briefing process

The new team briefing process will commence in September 2011 and will apply to all members of staff. On the fourth Wednesday of the month[2] (outlined in the team briefing calendar to follow), the President...
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