St. George Slaying the Dragon

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  • Topic: Horse, Dragon, Dragon 32/64
  • Pages : 2 (796 words )
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  • Published : April 9, 2012
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St. George Slaying the Dragon

Carlo Crivelli was alive during the Italian Renaissance in the 1400s. He was highly influenced by the Church and all of his works certainly represented that because everything he did was about religion. St. George Slaying the Dragon was completed in 1470 and is arguably his most prominent work. The empty sky makes him the focal point of the art along with his sword and halo allow him to stand out pretty easily from the rest of the objects in the painting. One would assume that someone saving a kingdom from a fierce dragon would be a big strong man, but looking at St. George, he looks like a small little schoolboy that is in desperate need of a haircut. The women on the plateau right above the dragon looks very innocent and was sure to meet her maker when the Dragon started this mayhem until her savior came to the rescue on a white stallion. The white stallion represents purity and is shown because of its genuine fear of being so close to the evil dragon. Also, George’s lance symbolizes the power of the Church over evil because of it being red and white which just so happen to be the Papal colors. It is quite clear that the Church wins over evil because of the lance being stuck through the creature’s mouth and neck. According to answers.com, they claim that evil vampires do not have shadows and coincidentally, neither does the dragon, which shows the evil it truly has because the stallion along with George on top has a shadow. It would be utterly heinous to not make a mention of the bravery exuberated by the stallion’s manhood below the belt, which Sister Wendy would most certainly characterize as strength and honor; while the wimpy dragon does not have the collection shown by the stallion.

The lines in Crivelli’s painting are for the most part finely detailed. I think it shows that Crivelli put in a lot of time and effort to make this painting come to life. The sharp, thin lines on St. George and the horse show how they are...
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