Sri Lanka Food

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Sri Lanka's meal consist of a large serving of rice followed by up to twelve different side dishes such vegetables, egg, meat, or fish stewed together with peppers, spices, and often coconut milk. This rice and curry meal is traditionally eaten in the afternoon, however it may also be served in the evening. The traditional morning and evening meals usually consist of string hoppers (fresh rice noodles), hoppers (cup-shaped pancakes), roti (coconut flat bread), or thosai (sourdough pancakes), served with a sambol (a mixture of hot peppers and other vegetables, served cool) and one or two curries. Snacks and beverages are strong, sweat tea, usually with milk, is drunk alone or following a small serving of finger food or sweets, especially at mid-morning and late afternoon. Curd, a yogurt made from the milk of water buffaloes or cows, is often served as a dessert with palm syrup or sugar. A rich variety of fruits is available year-round. Eating outside of the home is not a common trend. In almost every town there is at least one Chinese-style restaurant where alcohol is also served, as well as Sinhala, Muslim, and Tamil restaurants and traditional snack booths. In the capital, Western chain restaurants as well as other foreign-style foods are available. Ceremonial foods: Kiribath is a rice cooked in coconut milk that is part of nearly every special occasion in Sri Lanka. Kawum (sweet oil cakes) and other special snacks are also popular at special events. Alcoholic beverages do not play a role in the formal rituals of Sri Lanka. It is being condemned by Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism alike. Alcohol is, however, a part of men's social gatherings. The local alcoholic drink is Arrack .
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