Sprint Performance

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Article 1
Fletcher, I. (2010). The effects of pre-competition massage on the kinematic parameters of 20-m sprint performance. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. Champaign: May 2010. Vol. 24, Issue. 5; pg. 1179.

The author examines the effects of 3 different methods of warm ups in sprinting, but specifically focuses on the use of massage. The article presents details of methods applied, consisting of: 1. A pre-competition massage;

2. A traditional warm up;
3. A massage and warm up combined.
The study was conducted with 20 volunteer male collegiate sports players. All were volunteers who played sport at least 3 times a week and who undertook regular sprint training as part of their physical preparation. All 20 athletes were tested on 20 metre sprint performances to examine the results. After all 3 methods’ results were analysed, and it was clear that there were no significant differences apparent in any of the 3 approaches. The pre-competition massage results were the slowest results observed. The results of the study found that massage before sprinting was not found to significantly improve performance and shouldn’t be used as a replacement for a traditional active warm up. The article is published in a reputable exercise physiology journal of sports sciences, and clearly suggest that there are more productive methods that could be used to enhance sprint performance.

Article 2
If you must use static stretching in a warm-up it should be immediately followed by a sport-specific dynamic warm-up. (2009). NSCA's Performance Training Journal, 8(6), 4. The purpose of the study by the author was to examine whether the protocols of the static stretching and dynamic stretching increased the performance of an athlete in the tests created. The article highlighted the importance of warm up in sports and examined if static and dynamic stretching can ensure better results and fewer injuries in specific sports. The article went into great depth in relation to finding the best warm up available for athletes to succeed. The study was performed by 12 athletes from the Australian Institute of sport who had to undergo 2 familiarisation sessions about the sessions before examination. The exercise protocol utilized consisted of a sub maximal run followed by a 20 metre sprint test and a vertical jump test, with two test sessions being conducted over a 15 minute period. The testing followed very strict regulations ensuring the examination was done successfully. The results of the study found that static stretching resulted in significantly worse performance than a dynamic or skill based warm up, with the times and metres jumped varying significantly. The study clearly proved that for static stretching to be a successful method, it must be followed with a moderate to high intensity sport specific warm up. The article is published in reputable science and medicine in sport journal and proves that all warm ups must have some form of active stretching to ensure an athlete performs to their best.

Article 3
Vetter, R. E. (2007). Effects of six warm-up protocols on sprint and jump performance. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (Allen Press Publishing Services Inc.), 21(3), 819-823. The author’s purpose of the study was to compare the effects of 6 warm-up protocols on 2 different power manoeuvres to find an athlete’s best chance of quality performance. The article highlighted the various warm ups available to athletes and examined all possible warm up methods to compare on sprint and jump performance. The article also went into great detail in relation to the static and dynamic stretching and how these two methods of stretching can improve or diminish an athlete’s performance. The study was performed with 26 active college men and women who exercised for a minimum of 30 minutes, 3-5 times weekly volunteering for the study. The warm up protocols consisted of: (a) Walk plus run (WR);

(b) WR plus...
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