Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing Cultural Mediation Criticism

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Spike
 Lee’s
 Do
 the
 Right
 Thing
 Cultural
 Mediation
 Criticism.
  “Works
 of
 ethnic
 literature
 -­‐
 written
 by,
 about
 or
 for
 persons
 who
 perceived
  themselves,
 or
 were
 perceived
 by
 others
 as
 members
 of
 ethnic
 groups
 -­‐
 may
 thus
 be
  read
 not
 only
 as
 expressions
 of
 mediation
 between
 cultures
 but
 also
 as
 handbooks
 of
  socialization
 into
 the
 codes
 of
 Americanness”
 (Sollors,
 7).
  American
 Iilmmaker
 Spike
 Lee
 is
 widely
 known
 to
 create
 controversial,
 

politically
 minded
 and
 oppositional
 dramatic
 cinema.
 From
 his
 fairly
 indie
 Iilms
 such
 as
  She’s
 Gotta
 Have
 It
 and
 School
 Days
 to
 his
 mainstream
 feature
 length
 blockbuster,
 Do
  the
 Right
 Thing,
 Lee
 attempts
 to
 paint
 a
 picture
 of
 an
 ethnic
 group
 that
 may
 or
 may
 not
  be
 relatable
 to
 a
 dissimilar
 ethic
 group.
 Lee’s
 Iilm
 is
 a
 unique
 perspective
 into
  “blackness”
 in
 NYC,
 but
 it
 is
 dangerous
 to
 categorize
 his
 Iilm
 as
 truth;
 dangerous
 to
  accept
 his
 Iilm
 for
 its
 accurate
 depiction
 of
 reality.
 Wahneema
 Lubiano,
 in
 her
 article
  Reading
 Realism,
 Representation
 and
 Essentialism
 in
 Do
 the
 Right
 Thing,
 
 explains
 that
  Lee’s
 over
 criticized
 Iilm
 was
 reviewed
 on
 the
 grounds
 of
 realism,
 where
 the
 Iilm
 itself
  represent
 the
 “real
 black
 ghetto”
 in
 a
 satirical
 manner.
 Lee’s
 narrative
 form
 is
 only
 real
  in
 the
 sense
 that
 his
 slice
 of
 rice
 has
 some
 elements
 of
 fact,
 and
 therefore,
 the
 whole
 is
  mistakenly
 accepted
 by
 many
 as
 fact.
 Lee’s
 version
 of
 reality
 is
 promiscuous
 (Lubiano,
  263).
 However,
 Do
 the
 Right
 Thing
 cannot
 be
 immediately
 marked
 off
 as
 an
 ethnic
 text.
  As
 Phillip
 Hanson
 points
 out
 in
 his
 article
 The
 Politics
 of
 Inner
 City
 Identity
 in
 Do
 the
  Right
 Thing,
 Lee
 has
 a
 unique
 discourse
 of
 the
 inner
 city
 ghetto
 and
 expresses
 the
  oppression
 and
 anger
 felt
 by
 the
 black
 community
 represented
 in
 the
 Iilm
 and
 possibly,
  a
 black
 audience.
 Even
 though
 Do
 the
 Right
 Thing
 has
 it’s
 Ilaws
 as
 an
 ethnic
 text,
 this
  representation
 may
 still
 function
 as
 an
 ethnic
 text,
 as
 Werner
 Sollors,
 in
 his
 article
 

Beyond
 Ethnicity:
 Consent
 and
 Descent
 in
 American
 Culture
 mentions
 that
 ethnic
  literature
 provides
 Americans
 with
 a
 grammar
 of
 conduct
 (Sollors,
 7).
 
 Lee’s
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